March 2008, V7#3: Computer Tuesday, Dec 30 2008 

In MS Word, some files look different “on the page” in the computer. What causes this?

It’s called page view. Yes, you can set your program to show you the pages in different ways. It’s easy once you know how. Look down the screen to near the start button – where there are several “lines” of gray “stuff” before you see the bottom edge of the document. At the top left of all of this gray are 4 buttons before the side-to-side scroll bar starts. The page view with the dotted line to show page break is called “normal” and it is that far left button (depressed) – the arrow below is pointing to these buttons:
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To see how the other 3 views work, position a file where you can see the page break and just left click each button in turn. Besides normal view, I sometimes like print view which is the third button from the left, as it shows me virtual sheets of paper with the correct margins and page number too. – CAC

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February 2007, V6#2: Computer Tuesday, Dec 30 2008 

What software to use? (part 3)

Especially if you have some experience with Microsoft software, one might consider buying Microsoft Office (instead of single particular program), which will include Word, a spreadsheet/database program, usually a webpage program, and sometimes Publisher. This is a long range planning consideration – especially if you are looking toward being a life-long author. Not every book project will be well suited to a single program. Transcriptions, and columnar data works very well in Excel. This data can be sorted, rearranged and selectively inserted into a Word manuscript – all without having to retype.

September 2006, V5#9: Computer Saturday, Dec 27 2008 

(Mis)Spelling with Microsoft

While this trick may work with other programs, it seems to work like a dream in most MS Office programs. Do you have a word that seems misspelled but you don’t want to run the spell check? Right click the word, a option menu will pop up with several alternatives. Just click the correct on and the word will be fixed without having to run spell check.

November 2005, V4#11: Computer Friday, Dec 26 2008 

Organization – part 1

Having trouble finding anything on your computer?  Are you a “file dumper” into My Documents?  Consider that today’s hard drives have space to hold a room full of filing cabinet information.  Too many people don’t treat their hard drive like the filing system it is.  Many of those that do, start out with good intentions and then for some reason, over time, “just save it” with the intention of moving it later.  At best, this makes the file hard to find, at worst it results in different versions of the “same” files or even exact duplicate files (taking up usable space).

First thing to do when deciding on how your filing system should work is decide what level you (and others using the computer)  are at.  Realize that different types of software programs produce different types of computer files.  Can you look at an “open” directory and see the files you want to open and ignore the rest?  Example:  A novice is working in Word (word processor) and wishes to open a photo.  They will generally try File, Open – resulting in “gobilty gook”.  If this is your problem, I suggest start out segregating your types of files – in “My Documents” have a file for each type of program you use, i.e. Word, Works, Adobe Acrobat, Publisher, Draw, Family Tree Maker, Quark, Photoshop, etc.  From then on, never save a particular format file in a different programs area.  This cuts down on trying to open files the wrong way, but adds to your organization structure. 

One way to make all purpose files: click Start, from menu go to My Documents – this will open a window. From the left column you may choose “make a new folder”. If selection is not available, click in blank area to deselect any folders.  (If column is not there , click File, slide down to new, slide over and click Folder)  Name your folder next, and repeat as necessary.  When you are ready to build folders in any one of the folders you have made, double click it and begin.

More next month…

April 2003, V2#4: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Microsoft Word
Make your program stop underlining/linking web information.

Ever wish your computer wouldn’t try to help you so much?  Get tired of typing an email or web page address out only to have it underline and turn blue or a strange color?  Here’s what to do!

A quick fix is once the information that has been typed has gone blue, just hit the delete button once, it will “un-blue/link” without deleting text.  

If you wish it wouldn’t happen at all, here is what you do: 

  • From pull down menus on top, select format

  • From menu select auto format

  • From auto format, choose options button

  • From options box choose “auto format as you type” tab

  • Under “replace as you type” (middle section) click the bottom box –
    deselecting “internet and network paths with hyperlinks”

  • Choose OK, then OK

This information is provided on MS Word 2000, if your version differs, instructions may be a bit different, but you should be able to get it figured out with the instructions above.

February 2003, V2#2: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Tabs
Software: Microsoft Word

Ever want to line up a column of text/numbers and they don’t want to work?  While some may never line up exactly how you want them due to the fact that “all fonts are not created equal”, have you considered the different types of tab stops available?

Start your program.  At the top of your document window (pane) is your tab line.  The tiny box to the far left shows what type of tab you may be using.  Default tab stops are .5″ and of the standard variety.  To set the tab, just click in the ruler-type area to the right (directly above the document) where you want a tab.  This sets the tab for anywhere in the document below your cursor.  To get rid of any set tab, just drag (while your mouse is positioned over it, click and hold down the left mouse button and drag, releasing it when it is off the line) it off to the left.  To change the type of tab, click the box at far left.  There are several different types of tabs available including a decimal tab.  You can also set a tab stop for a particular section by highlighting it first before setting the tab.

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