June 2017 E-magazine Wednesday, Jun 28 2017 

///////////////////////////////
What’s It Mean? A-Z
///////////////////////////////

Post binding:  See Chicago Screw

Point: Unit of thickness, one thousandth of an inch (0.001″).

Terms marked with an asterisk (*) are not generally used in our office.

-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-
For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at
http://www.gregathcomany.com/info/dictionary and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/info/dictionary/writers.html

Run across a word that you don’t understand? Try us – email us your word, term or phrase and we will see if we can shed some light on the matter!
-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-

///////////////////////////////
Design Inspiration
///////////////////////////////

When designing mailing tools, consider the number your are mailing at one time as well as the number of times you may mail over the next year. Utilizing a permit imprint saves you time placing stamps on each item as well as saving money. There are several things you can do with an imprint that will have to be added to your camera ready layout. *******

In addition to retail postage (stamps), if you are mailing more than 200 at one time, Gregath can get you a marketing discount and you can skip the stamps. If mailing more than 500 at one time, first class mail imprint (no stamps) may be an economical option.

-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-
More information can be found at
http://www.gregathcompany.com/service/shipping/bulkmail.html
-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-

///////////////////////////////
Book Manufacturing Concepts – not in this issue
///////////////////////////////

///////////////////////////////
Marketing advice
///////////////////////////////

For your information – in case you hadn’t noticed yet: USPS has renamed their business class mail rate again. Add standard mail rate to history along with third class, second class, and bulk mail. For business imprint, Standard Mail is still current, with USPS instructing the change to Marketing mail in the future.

-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-
This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/service/shipping/bulkmail.html
-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-

///////////////////////////////
Genealogy ideas
///////////////////////////////

The Connecticut State Library is producing a fine online resource for WWI information: http://ctinworldwar1.org/. This is an ongoing effort that may be a goldmine for some.

-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-
Have a tip?  e-mail us

///////////////////////////////
Computer aid!?!
///////////////////////////////

As we all continue to look at getting newer operating systems (OS), like Windows 10, keep in mind that not all of your old programs may work on the new OS – even anti-virus subscriptions.

July 2015 Magazine – Computer Aid Thursday, Jul 2 2015 

Do you like adopting new bells and whistles for your computer? Have you checked out this database of cool (and helpful) stuff?
http://www.wincustomize.com/

June 2007, V6#6: Computer Tuesday, Dec 30 2008 

Don’t be bullied into Windows Vista. Every new version of a program (or operating system) means change. Unfortunately, you will have to make a plan to eventually use the new system, but it doesn’t have to be today. On your “to do” list, research Vista online, check out a library book, schedule a “study date” with a friend who already has it (offer to bring the snacks), attend lectures or even an evening Vo-Tech class on the subject. Even if you need a new computer, you may be able to put it off until you’ve had a chance to make friends with the new Windows.

January 2007, V6#1: Computer Tuesday, Dec 30 2008 

What software to use? (part 2)

If you are looking for a “desktop typewriter”, almost any word processing software will do. If you have a Microsoft Window based system, you have WordPad. This is a very basic program, but if you aren’t interested in any bells and whistles (such as spell check, etc.), it is fairly easy to learn and operate. If you don’t have a MS Windows based system, or want to look at something else, there are many shareware programs available at little or no cost.

November 2006, V5#11: Computer Saturday, Dec 27 2008 

Do you find yourself typing (or modifying) the same kind of letter over and over? Reduce the chance of mix ups through cut and paste or saving over old file copies by making a template. In many Windows based programs it is fairly simple. Make the “cookie cutter” basis that you will be using over and over again. This even works well for non raised letterhead! Next, choose “save as”. When you have the save as dialog box up, go to the bottom boxes and click the down arrow (right side) for the file type. From the pull down list that just came up, choose template, or .tmp, check the file name (change it if you want), then OK. Now, next time you want to use the text, click the “file” pull down menu and choose new. Selections may come up on the right side of your screen, or you will get a box that allows you to choose from templates. Choose the template and off you go! When you open a template, modify it and are ready to save, it automatically assumes you are not modifying the template, but producing a file in the default format – such as .doc for Word.

January 2006, V5#1: Computer Friday, Dec 26 2008 

Organization – part 3

As you begin wholesale organization, you may find more than one copy of a file that is similar, if not apparently an exact duplicate.  There is no reason (other than personal preference and convenience) to have more than one file with the same information in it on your hard drive.  Back up copies may be made on any number of types of removable media (CDs, flash drives, memory cards or sticks, etc.) or even a dedicated back up hard drive.

So, how do you select what to keep and what to pitch without extensive proofing to be sure you don’t delete the best one?  Here are a few suggestions:

In Windows Explorer (or even just an “open” window), find the “Views” button near the top, just under the title bar.  This button will look similar to an index card with dots and/or dashes on it and may have a down arrow to the right of it.  Clicking the main button will “scroll” through the types of views the computer allows you to see for the contents of the file.  If a down arrow is showing, clicking it will give you a list of the views.  For this, select the “details” – it will show file name, save date, file size, etc. in columns.  Next, locate your apparently duplicate files – were they saved on the same date, are they the same size, etc.  Use this information to help you decide which may be the best to keep and what is outdated.

Still not sure what to keep?  Choose one to keep on the hard drive and make a backup media copy of all other versions – in case they are ever needed.

More next month…