June 2015 Magazine – Design Saturday, Jun 6 2015 

Will you make an electronic edition available as well as printed books? Consider your formats in each to decide if one manuscript can be used without modification or by adding functionality to the electronic edition. Sometimes dual manuscripts for dual format editions are best.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design/digital

October 2008, V7#10: Computer Saturday, Jan 3 2009 

Create a gutter margin in MS Word

Microsoft Word (all versions) If you are preparing a camera ready digital manuscript of any length at all, you probably want a  binding margin – commonly called a gutter margin. In MS Word, you add the extra gutter space through mirror margins. With the file you want margins for open, select “File” at the top of your screen to get the pull-down menu; select “Page Setup”; if not already visible, select “margins”; set “Top”, “Bottom”, “Left”, and “Right” all the same size; set gutter to add the extra binding space to your taste; choose gutter position to fit the orientation of paper – left for long edge binding; under the pages/multiple pages setting click the arrow down and choose mirror – this will alter the preview at the bottom of the box – showing the gutter in crosshatch; select OK or “Default” then “OK”. If you are (going to be) working with multiple files, select “Default” before closing this dialog box. Also, if you are setting margins on a file that already has text in it, make sure “Whole document” is selected in the “Apply to:” dialog box. When you have typed in your headers and footers, print out a page and use a ruler to be sure all four margins are where you thought they’d be. If it is not, repeat this process changing the settings that are not the right size. Different versions of word, as well as printers and fonts will impact your best settings.

December 2007, V6#12: Computer Tuesday, Dec 30 2008 

Not sure if files written in MS Office 2007 are compatible? The truth is that they are with a bit of work on your part. If you are running an older version of a program and try to open the 2007 file, it will prompt you do download a conversion program. If you are online, follow all directions – including downloading other updates first. Your computer can then convert the 2007 file to something your computer can work with. Word of warning though, if the file contains features that became available in 2007, your converted file won’t have them.

June 2007, V6#6: Computer Tuesday, Dec 30 2008 

Don’t be bullied into Windows Vista. Every new version of a program (or operating system) means change. Unfortunately, you will have to make a plan to eventually use the new system, but it doesn’t have to be today. On your “to do” list, research Vista online, check out a library book, schedule a “study date” with a friend who already has it (offer to bring the snacks), attend lectures or even an evening Vo-Tech class on the subject. Even if you need a new computer, you may be able to put it off until you’ve had a chance to make friends with the new Windows.

November 2005, V4#11: Computer Friday, Dec 26 2008 

Organization – part 1

Having trouble finding anything on your computer?  Are you a “file dumper” into My Documents?  Consider that today’s hard drives have space to hold a room full of filing cabinet information.  Too many people don’t treat their hard drive like the filing system it is.  Many of those that do, start out with good intentions and then for some reason, over time, “just save it” with the intention of moving it later.  At best, this makes the file hard to find, at worst it results in different versions of the “same” files or even exact duplicate files (taking up usable space).

First thing to do when deciding on how your filing system should work is decide what level you (and others using the computer)  are at.  Realize that different types of software programs produce different types of computer files.  Can you look at an “open” directory and see the files you want to open and ignore the rest?  Example:  A novice is working in Word (word processor) and wishes to open a photo.  They will generally try File, Open – resulting in “gobilty gook”.  If this is your problem, I suggest start out segregating your types of files – in “My Documents” have a file for each type of program you use, i.e. Word, Works, Adobe Acrobat, Publisher, Draw, Family Tree Maker, Quark, Photoshop, etc.  From then on, never save a particular format file in a different programs area.  This cuts down on trying to open files the wrong way, but adds to your organization structure. 

One way to make all purpose files: click Start, from menu go to My Documents – this will open a window. From the left column you may choose “make a new folder”. If selection is not available, click in blank area to deselect any folders.  (If column is not there , click File, slide down to new, slide over and click Folder)  Name your folder next, and repeat as necessary.  When you are ready to build folders in any one of the folders you have made, double click it and begin.

More next month…