May 2015 Magazine – Genealogy Tuesday, May 19 2015 

When researching in the period of the Civil War in the United States, consider what area the contemporary state was:

Northern States California Connecticut Illinois Indiana
Iowa Kansas Main Massachusetts
Michigan Minnesota New Hampshire New Jersey
New York Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania
Rhode Island Vermont West Virginia Wisconsin
Southern States Seceded before 15 April 1861 Alabama Florida Georgia Louisiana
Mississippi South Carolina Texas
Slaves States Did not secede Arkansas North Carolina Tennessee Virginia
Delaware District of Columbia Kentucky Maryland
Missouri
Territories not yet formed Arizona Colorado Idaho Oklahoma
Montana Nebraska Nevada New Mexico
North Dakota South Dakota Utah Washington

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This section is drawn from Genealogy by Berry (including map)

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December 2005, V4#12: Genealogy Tuesday, Jan 6 2009 

Retrieving Data on Thermal Paper
By Alice Syman in Saint Augustine, Florida, USA

I have some old files containing faxes on that old fax [thermal] paper that eventually fades. I heard that there was some type of light that would restore them, but couldn’t find out the name and probably couldn’t have afforded it anyway. I wondered, what is it that restores them — light or heat or a combination of both and possibly with something else.

I turned on a burner on my gas stove and began running the paper, print side down, back and forth over the flame. When I saw a strip of paper turning dark I looked and eureka! I could read almost every word of the print, typed and handwritten. A miracle. I was able to send an adopted person information about his adoption that he had lost long ago.

This has to be done slowly and carefully and the flame shouldn’t be too high because one can get a nasty burn. I placed the restored copies in clear sheets. How long they will be legible, I don’t know. But they’ll last at least until one can transcribe the information from them.

I sent this bit of info to many other researchers. To date none have said they knew about it already. I would be interested to know from your readers if I was just way behind the times on this valuable (to me) secret.

Previously published in RootsWeb Review: 12 October 2005, Vol. 8, No. 41

November 2003, V2#11: Genealogy Saturday, Jan 3 2009 

If you haven’t done so already, check http://www.usgenweb.com for resources available in your area you need researched – the same for http://www.worldgenweb.com

July 2003, V2#7: Genealogy Saturday, Jan 3 2009 

While becoming that student of history we have already suggested, is your lost ancestor in America during the time the US was giving out free land to it’s citizens?  If so, your next stop should be the homestead records!  This little utilized collection of documents and information is housed at the national archives and has not been reproduced or indexed in any wide reaching way.  The Homestead National Monument has begun exploring the best way to augment NARA general paper preservation process by replicating them in Nebraska.

August 2004, V3#8: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Take a visit to the US National Archives.  They are making more and more available online.  While this will never take the place of research trips, there are lots of things to help you out.  For instance, several of their printed publications are available in their entirety online free of charge.

http://www.nara.gov