Electronic Magaizine Issues now all current! Tuesday, May 20 2014 

Our monthly electronic magazine has now been brought up and is current. You can view individual entries on our blog – by subject, or go to our website to view them by issue.

May 2012 E-Zine (V11#5): Marketing Monday, May 7 2012 

Especially if speaking at an event that you are not otherwise compensated for, don’t forget to ask those in attendance to, not only spread the word about your book, but also if they can think of any other groups who might enjoy you as a speaker.  Don’t be shy about taking contact information and following up the leads.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/marketing/events.html

April 2009, V8#4: Genealogy Monday, Apr 6 2009 

Q. There is a pre-existing work on the subject material I’d like to publish a book for. Is there a way to further the work done in that book, if I don’t have a Copyright release?

A. If you are working on new material to complement an original book, your  first step is to try contacting the author or her estate. You can work with them as to how much of the original content you may use in your new book. Even if you don’t wish to use any of their original content, establishing a relationship will help spread the word about your project.

 
If unable to obtain Copyright release, your new book should not be presented as an update. However, your new material can fully cross-reference previous works that you don’t own. For instance, you add more information on “Sally” and “Jerry”, who were children  in the original work. They both have families of their own now and Jerry has a new grandbaby. All this factual information can be included in your new book – just no “stories” as printed in the original book. You would then make a note that these two were listed on page XX in The book. Your new material can reference many previous works in this way.Visit our Copyright web page or the Library of Congress for more information on Copyright.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/msschelp.html

February 2005, V4#2: Design Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Photo thoughts: The author, will be the person with the final say as to what  goes into the printed book.  While many families would love to see every photo available in print, this is rarely economical.  Because of this, the author may have some major decisions on what “makes the cut”.  Final decisions should include not only the quality and subject of the photograph, which may effect the tone of the picture page, but also who is in the photo.  Economically, printed photographs will be black and white.  Since not everyone has an eye for what color photos will look like in black and white, the author may get an idea by converting it.  They can either digitize it and change the color file to grayscale, or place the photo on a b/w copy machine.  A color picnic picture in a sun dappled glade may seem perfect in composition, tone, and quality, but may not be a very good black and white.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://gregathcompany.com/udo.html

September 2003, V2#9: Design Saturday, Jan 17 2009 

While crop for effect (as mentioned last month) is usually a little more expensive at most publishing houses, we perform this service to some extent, free of charge and the end result is much more gratifying. Our professionals will choose exactly where the half-tone should be cropped and/or enlarged/reduced at no additional charge to you.  After all, are you trying to show Uncle Ed or the yard he was standing in? Of course, there are times when the background IS the picture. We also receive instructions to enlarge or reduce to a specified size without cropping and it is physically impossible to comply, because without cropping, the size specified cannot be reached from the original without warping the outcome. Enlargement or reduction can only be done overall, not in only one direction. When we face such a problem, we use the largest dimension, and let the smaller fall where it may. [If 3″x5″ is specified, when we get to the 5″ measurement, the requested 3″ may be less than 3″.] If an author prefers total control over their sizing and cropping, this can also be done with us at an additional charge in-house or they can send exactly what they want and mark “same size originals” at no additional cost.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/tips.html 

August 2003, V2#8: Design Sunday, Jan 11 2009 

We receive manuscripts, including pictures with the instructions “Do Not Cut Pictures”, every day. No printer that we know of would have any reason to cut your ORIGINAL pictures/submissions. In our printing process, a negative and a new print [known as a half-tone) must be made in order to be reproduced on an offset press. Many snapshots are of one or a few family members, with a whole lot of unnecessary background. Most of these pictures show very little, if any, detail of the subject. If they were enlarged and the half tone “cropped for effect”, the same size picture would show the subject(s) in much more detail.

August 2007, V6#8: Genealogy Wednesday, Jan 7 2009 

Have you checked out PERSI lately? It is available through HeritageQuest. While this is a subscription program, many libraries with strong genealogy programs allow access on site, and some do from your home. More about PERSI from the Allen County Public Library (http://www.acpl.lib.in.us/genealogy/persi.html):

“The Periodical Source Index, or PERSI, is the largest subject index to genealogical and historical periodical articles in the world. Created by the foundation and department staff of the Genealogy Center of the library here in Fort Wayne, Indiana, PERSI is widely recognized as being a vital source for genealogical researchers.

PERSI is a comprehensive subject index covering genealogy and local history periodicals written in English and French (Canada) since 1800. The time period of the articles ranges from the 1700s to the present. More than 1.8 million index entries from nearly ten thousand titles are represented by this work.

If you are in one of the fourteen Allen County Public Library facilities, you may search the PERSI resource by clicking on “E-Resources” on the main webpage <www.ACPL.Info> and scrolling down to “HeritageQuestOnline.” Clicking on that link and then choosing the “Search PERSI” option with open the index for you. If you do not live in Allen County, IN, check with your local library about the availability of HeritageQuestOnline in your area.”

April 2008, V7#4: Computer Wednesday, Dec 31 2008 

Today’s browsers are great to help with general searches. Many places and software even load extra search toolbars into your browsers. But, for genealogy searches, don’t stop with that. Become a student of search engines: Find out how you can narrow your search with different engines. Find at least one “engine” that searches more than one. Not used to doing computer searches? Go to ask.com – there you can use a regular sentence to search without being penalized for using words like “and” and “the”. Also consider trying clusty.com – this search engine places your returns by subject. In this way, if you were to look for “Homer Simpson” all the cartoon stuff would be sorted out for you.