June 2017 E-magazine Wednesday, Jun 28 2017 

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What’s It Mean? A-Z
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Post binding:  See Chicago Screw

Point: Unit of thickness, one thousandth of an inch (0.001″).

Terms marked with an asterisk (*) are not generally used in our office.

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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at
http://www.gregathcomany.com/info/dictionary and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/info/dictionary/writers.html

Run across a word that you don’t understand? Try us – email us your word, term or phrase and we will see if we can shed some light on the matter!
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Design Inspiration
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When designing mailing tools, consider the number your are mailing at one time as well as the number of times you may mail over the next year. Utilizing a permit imprint saves you time placing stamps on each item as well as saving money. There are several things you can do with an imprint that will have to be added to your camera ready layout. *******

In addition to retail postage (stamps), if you are mailing more than 200 at one time, Gregath can get you a marketing discount and you can skip the stamps. If mailing more than 500 at one time, first class mail imprint (no stamps) may be an economical option.

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More information can be found at
http://www.gregathcompany.com/service/shipping/bulkmail.html
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Book Manufacturing Concepts – not in this issue
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Marketing advice
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For your information – in case you hadn’t noticed yet: USPS has renamed their business class mail rate again. Add standard mail rate to history along with third class, second class, and bulk mail. For business imprint, Standard Mail is still current, with USPS instructing the change to Marketing mail in the future.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/service/shipping/bulkmail.html
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Genealogy ideas
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The Connecticut State Library is producing a fine online resource for WWI information: http://ctinworldwar1.org/. This is an ongoing effort that may be a goldmine for some.

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Have a tip?  e-mail us

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Computer aid!?!
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As we all continue to look at getting newer operating systems (OS), like Windows 10, keep in mind that not all of your old programs may work on the new OS – even anti-virus subscriptions.

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March 2008, V7#3: Genealogy Wednesday, Jan 7 2009 

Stamping Your Books
By Cari Thomas

I found Gene Ewert’s suggestions about things to do when taking a
genealogy trip of great value, and several “rookie mistakes” he
mentioned were ones I’ve encountered through my years. Thanks Gene.

Gene suggested that the greatest rookie mistake was to not write
identification and contact information in your notebooks so that they
could be returned if lost. I would like to pass along an additional
suggestion.

I say “pass along” because this tip comes compliments of my late
mother-in-law, Mary Lib Tipton Thomas, who was a junior high school
librarian in Ohio for many years.

Mary Lib’s practice was not only to write identifying information on
the insides of the front and back covers as Gene Ewert suggested, but
to include it in the middle of the book as well. She always put the
school logo stamp on page fifty of each book in her library or in the
middle of the book if it had less than fifty pages.

A book would still be identifiable (and therefore returnable) because
of that interior stamp, even if it had lost its cover or end pages.
This tip is especially valuable for irreplaceable genealogical
notebooks and records.

To read Gene Ewert’s article, “What I Learned from my Genealogy Trip,”
visit:
http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/review/2007/1031.txt

Previously published in RootsWeb Review: 7 November 2007, Vol. 10, No. 45

January 2008, V7#1: Genealogy Wednesday, Jan 7 2009 

The Registry of War Ration Books, including 83 Canadian books can be found at the link below. For those of you not familiar with food rationing, during World War Two the government issued ration stamps in books to each family member. There were four series of books, and there was a
complicated maze of instructions (typically published in the newspaper) as to which stamps were valid at any given time.

Prior to this project at Genealogy Today, the largest known private collection of ration books was a 900-book collection housed in Colorado. The registry was approaching 5,000 books (early October 2007), and is expected to double again in 2008. In addition to the books being collected,
contributions from visitors to the web site are helping expand the database and ensure these interesting genealogical documents get properly archived.

To view the images, visit this page and search for surnames:

Index of War Ration Books
http://genealogytoday.com/guide/war-ration-books.html

February 2007, V6#2: Genealogy Wednesday, Jan 7 2009 

The following was published in The Arkansas Genealogical Society E-zine, Volume 1, Number 4 (November 2006)

Contributed by Carolyn Earle Billingsley

Tips for Arkansas Researchers

Adding images to your family history should be part of every genealogist’s repertoire. Images like maps, pedigree charts, diagrams, and photos add interest and a personal touch to your research. But how many of you have thought about postcards?

Sometimes you don’t have an image of your grandfather visiting the courthouse, but you can still spice up your family history with a postcard image of that courthouse. In my case, for example, I don’t have a photo of my parents sitting on the steps of the high school where they graduated back in the 1940s, but I was able to find a postcard of the school that dated to that era.

You might be surprised how many post cards there are out there. E-bay is an excellent place for finding them.

And now Ancestry.com has a large collection of postcards online. Here’s their press release about this new collection:

Source Information: Ancestry.com. Historical Postcards Collection, c. 1893-1963 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, Inc., 2006. Original data: Mary Martin Postcards (www.MaryLMartin.com), Perryville, MD, USA.

About Historical Postcards Collection, c. 1893-1963:

This database contains approximately 50,000 postcards dating from about 1893-1963. About three-quarters of the postcards contain pictures from places within the United States, while the remaining fourth contains pictures from abroad. Information provided about each postcard includes:

Place information (city/town, county, state/province, country)
Caption
Postcard era (year range from which the postcard may be dated)

This database is primarily useful for obtaining a photograph or picture of a specific place in time. If you do not already have pictures of the places your ancestors lived, historical postcards are a good alternative to personal photos.

Ancestry’s collection even has an old postcard of the church my great-grandparents belonged to in Little Rock-and over 500 postcards of a variety of Arkansas sites. I especially liked the 1915 card of the old Confederate Soldiers Home, which has long since been torn down. The image includes the back side of the card, with the written message was written, along with the old stamp and the postmark.

So look around your relatives’ houses, poke around flea markets, search the Internet, peruse e-Bay, and check out Ancestry.com for images to fill in those gaps in your family’s pictorial history.

January 2005, V4#1: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Photoshop light photo edit

Do you have a digitized photograph that is nice, but has specks or small cracks in the background? If so, open the file in Adobe Photoshop.  Next, check to make sure your tools toolbar is visible (click “window”, if there isn’t a checkmark by “tools”, click it).  On the tools toolbar there is a clone stamp tool (the icon looks like a rubber stamper) that you click to select. Notice the bar under the pull down menus now reflects all the clone tool options.  Move your mouse near an imperfect spot (the size of the circle is controlled by the brush button at the top).  You may choose to play with the options to get what works best for you and the photo. Caution – in Photoshop you can only undo the last step.  Place the circle over an area that looks generally how the background “under” the imperfection should look.  While holding down the ALT key, left click your mouse.  Now move the circle over the imperfection (or part of it) and click.  A copy/clone of the ALT+click background replaces the imperfection.  You can repeat the steps as needed.  This generally works great with backgrounds because, as a rule, they are not too intricate. This method may also work to some extent on the subjects but is it much trickier.

April 2004, V3#4: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Email is such a “quick and easy” way to communicate – no stamps or LD fees.  Because of this, many a time-squeezed researcher has dashed off an email note without much thought to the “old standards” such as punctuation, spelling, etc.  When one of these emails is received by a researcher that is just as time squeezed, they are likely to put the poorly written missives toward the bottom of their “reply to” list.  Be truthful now – when you are organizing your reply list, do you normally put folks who can’t be bothered to write clearly at the top of your list?