July 2006, V5#7: Design Tuesday, Feb 24 2009 

Some interesting items we has seen go into genealogy and family history books include: WWII Ration book and what was left of the family stamps, photos of boot camp (including the bugler), military unit photos, listing of cemeteries (and locations) in the book, advertisements from family business, Railroad Card, etc.  Anything that someone may have (or currently do today) kept in/for a scrapbook should be considered.

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This section is drawn from http://www.gregathcompany.com/udo.html  

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Febrary 2009, V8#2: Marketing Monday, Feb 16 2009 

Free or nearly so:

Make your own coupons! These can be done in a variety of formats (flyers, brochures, book marks, business or post cards, etc.). Be sure to include all your contact information, the item in question, and something extra for the bearer. Coupons can be for a particular amount or % off, free or reduced shipping, an autographed copy, a mystery bonus (some imprinted advertising specialty), etc. The sky is the limit. Give the coupons out in person, leave them on freebie tables, tack them to bulletin boards, include them in correspondence, etc. Don’t forget to consider terms such as an expiration date and if the coupon needs to be surrendered.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/marketingfreeadvertising.html

 

 

May 2006, V5#5: Design Friday, Jan 30 2009 

Lower cost alternative to color custom printed end sheets:

  • Hand color b/w end sheets in your your special books.

September 2005, V4#9: Marketing Thursday, Jan 29 2009 

With pre-publication sales, consider offering, in addition to the pre-publication payment discount, something special about those paid books.  It could be author signed, numbered, include a color photo page, color divider pages, custom frontice piece, or an improved binding for an extra charge.  If the publishing project is for softbound books, offer a hardbound collectors edition price in addition to the regular discount softbound edition.  If going the hardbound/softbound marketing route, don’t forget to market to your libraries, especially if you are able to offer the hardbound edition for not much more than the standard retail for the softbound edition will be.

February 2005, V4#2: Marketing Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Include a photograph with any mailings (especially electronic): can be an action shot of the author writing or selling, or a special one from the book. If the book is already published, it could even be a “beauty shot” of the book itself.  Make sure to caption the photograph.  If it is from the book and the promotional material doesn’t address the photograph, the caption can be a bit longer to make sure you tie the photo to the book.

February 2004, V3#2: Design Monday, Jan 26 2009 

Make your publication special!  While there are many ways to accomplish this, one way is to number each book of your publication.  The easiest way to do this is to place a notation such as “First Edition, ___________ of 50” somewhere in the fore pages.  When the books arrive, you number the blank and, if so inclined, sign the book.  Another way to do this is to commission a particular numbered page go in each book.  Such as with a run of 100, there would be 100 different title pages each saying a different number of 100.  This can run into some additional expense if the “one of” pages are mechanically destroyed during the publication process.  With our process, the page can be replaced if destroyed.  However, the further along in the process it is when it gets destroyed means either a) more expense replacing it or b) that number would not exist. 

November 2002: V1#3: Marketing Wednesday, Dec 24 2008 

When deciding on what the total cost (retail) for you book is to be you need to consider not only production cost but any additional postage during manufacturing or other hidden costs as well as delivery postage to your customers (if you plan to sell “postage included”).  In a genealogy or family history, it is not usually smart to try to recoup research, manuscript preparation or travel time and expense through your retail price.  However, one may wish, once they have established the “break even point” and what profit margin they wish to have they might want to add in “standard wholesale”.  In the book industry genre (topic, subject) wide, book stores and book dealers expect to be able to buy books at 40% off the retail sales price.  If you add 40% to what you feel you need from a book, then you will be getting a basic price for wholesale sales and that basic price+40% on retail sales.  This also gives you room to run special pricing if you desire such as a lower pre-publication price (discussed next month) or a sale at a family reunion, etc.

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