February 2017 E-Zine Tuesday, Feb 7 2017 

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What’s It Mean? A-Z
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Paper Grain: The direction most of the fibers within paper generally lie, corresponding to the direction of their flow on the papermaking machine.

Paper Opacity: Nontransparent property which prevents or reduces “show through” of printing from the book side of the next sheet.

Terms marked with an asterisk (*) are not generally used in our office.

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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at
http://www.gregathcomany.com/info/dictionary and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/info/dictionary/writers.html

Run across a word that you don’t understand? Try us – email us your word, term or phrase and we will see if we can shed some light on the matter!
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Design Inspiration
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Via digital watermark consider adding monograms, coats of arms, or book subject/part wallpaper designs to some, or all pages.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/service/printing/watermark.html
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Book Manufacturing Concepts
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Too much of a good thing: While technology exists to jam pack content on a page, and layer it with digital watermarks, don’t use it in such a way that it splits the reader’s attention too much. You don’t want readers feeling like they have a puzzle book that is hard to read.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/service/printing/watermark.html
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Marketing advice
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When using book content online (marketing or sharing), do Copyright protect yourself by placing information in a watermark on each page/image. Visit a few examples on our website: Alexander Index (PDF), Green Index (PDF), Chute Cover (JPG)

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/service/printing/watermark.html
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Genealogy ideas
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Did you know the Library and Archives of Canada is digitizing (and making available) WWI soldier information: http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/first-world-war/first-world-war-1914-1918-cef/Pages/canadian-expeditionary-force.aspx

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Have a tip?  e-mail us
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Computer aid!?!
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Looking for other ways to have your manuscript “at hand”? A tablet may be a better compromise between a desk or laptop and a phone. Again, Android users can download MS Word app for free, while Windows users can access MS Word for free, while online. Many of today’s tablets can also attach keyboards, mice and wireless printers with ease while having robust memory (both speed and capacity).

February 2009, V8#2: Genealogy Monday, Feb 16 2009 

Web Site Lists Missing World War II Soldiers

Approximately 74,000 World War II soldiers have not had their remains recovered or identified.  In an attempt to aid in the recovery and identification process, the Missing Personnel World War II database was created.  The database is online at www.dtic.mil/dpmo/WWII_MIA/index.htm.  This first-ever comprehensive list is a project of the Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office and was completed in 2004. 

The database was created by comparing and analyzing two sources:  “Rosters of Military Personnel Whose Remains Were Not Recovered” and “The World War II Rosters of the Dead.”  All discrepancies were settled by using the National Archives and official personnel files.  The database contains the name of the missing soldier, service number, rank, branch of service and the date of loss. 

The accounting for missing World War II service members is an ongoing project.  As remains are recovered and identified, their names are removed from the database. 

When the war ended in August 1945, over 79,000 known soldiers were unaccounted for.  This number included individuals buried as “unknown” lost at sea and missing in action. 

There are similar databases for those missing from the Korean War, the Cold War, Vietnam and the Gulf War.  More information and access to these databases are found at www.dtic.mil/dpmo.

This information was taken from Paul Follett’s column Tree Tracers published in the Lawton Constitution on April 21, 2008 – via SWOGS.

February 2008, V7#2: Genealogy Wednesday, Jan 7 2009 

Pre-1946 Military Personnel Files Made Public

The National Personnel Records Center (NPRC) in St. Louis announced the release of all pre-1946 official military personnel files to researchers.

Documents found in a typical personnel file include assignments, evaluations, awards and decorations, training, demographic information, limited medical information and disciplinary actions.  Some files contain the soldier’s photograph.

To request a copy of a file, submit standard form 180 to NPRC, 9700 Page Ave., St. Louis, MO 63132.  The veteran or next-of-kin of a deceased veteran may use eVetRecs at www.archives.gov.veterans/evetrecs.index.html.

Copies of the personnel files are $15 for 5 pages or less and $50.00 for over 6 pages.  Most files contain over 6 pages.  Files of “persons of exceptional prominence” are $.75 per page.

Files may be viewed at the NPRC Archival Research Room in St. Louis.  The research room is open Tues-Fri, 10:00 am to 4:00 pm.  Call 314-801-0850 for a reservation.

Additional information concerning the opening of these records is found in the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) press release at http://www.archives.gov/press/press-releases/2008/nr08-14.html.

The National Personnel Records Center is the repository for the 20th century service records.  The files consist of personnel, health and medical records of discharged and deceased solders from all the services.  The repository holds over 57 million individual files.  Every year additional records will be released for public use.

Pre-World War I military records are available from the National Archives in Washington DC.  For further information, visit the NARA webpage at http://www.archives.gov/genealogy/military.

This information was taken from Paul Follett’s column Tree Tracers published in the Lawton Constitution on November 5, 2007.