E-Magazine Volume 12 Issue 6: What does it mean? A-Z Thursday, Jun 6 2013 

Art(work): Non-text material (in our shop, this excludes photographs) – may include such things as decorative lettering (not font related), drawings, ornamentation, tables, charts, sketches, maps, reproductions of documents, decorative borders, etc.

Basic Size: Standard sheet size per type of paper that determines the weight.

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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at
http://www.gregathcomany.com/info/dictionary and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/info/dictionary/writers.html

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July 2009: V8#7: Marketing Friday, Jul 3 2009 

The USPS now has three different “shoebox” sizes of priority boxes for your convenience. This works extremely well for small format books, as the small box costs less to ship.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/marketing/bookselling.html

August 2006, V5 #8: Computer Friday, Mar 20 2009 

Larger Type (MS Word and Internet Explorer – at least)

Does it seem like every document or web page you open has smaller text then the last? If your mouse of choice has a wheel (“wheel mouse”), you may be in luck. In at least Microsoft Word and Internet Explorer, this trick works like a dream (most of the time): When you want to see the text larger on a page or document you are viewing, be sure your mouse pointer is somewhere on the “page” in question, hold down your control key and move your wheel away from you (while holding the mouse still). This should zoom the text in direct relation to how far you move the wheel. The reverse is true if moving the wheel toward you. Try this in your favorite program – it might work there too!

January 2006, V5#1: Production Thursday, Jan 29 2009 

Basic Paper Primer

Paper  weight is based on the basic size of a given paper as determined by a given mill.  For this reason, many weight notations one finds has at least 2 separate numbers.  This does not necessarily mean the weight fluctuates between the two.  Generally with printers and suppliers is not a range, but a definition from more than one source and may include more than one grade of paper (bond, text, etc.).  A 50/60# paper is ordered as 50# and as 60#.  However, when put through standardized testing, it is found that each sheet carries the same weight. All specifics supplied If in doubt, check with the business presenting the number information for formal explanation.  Gregath paper suppliers do recognize the standard variation in basis weight of + or – 5% as acceptable by industry standards.

Paper brightness affects the legibility and contrast of printing.  The brightness test measures the reluctance of paper under strict optimal conditions and related it to a white standard (Magnesium Oxide).  The test is mainly applicable to white paper grades.  Basic offset grades are usually in the 80% brightness range.  Aesthetic importance may also be given to the brighter papers.  However, if archival quality is a focus, one must be certain that it is not traded for the brightness.  White papers with 90+ brightness sometimes actually have a blue or colored cast due to additives. 

December 2005, V4#12: Define Thursday, Jan 29 2009 

Basic Size: Standard sheet size per type of paper that determines the weight.

Basis weight: “Weight” of a given paper determined by the weight of 500 basic size sheets.

Paper Basis Weight: designation given to a sheet of paper in terms of weight of 500 sheets (1 ream) in the standard size.

November 2005, V4#11: Define Thursday, Jan 29 2009 

Point: Unit of thickness, one thousandth of an inch (0.001″).

Ream: 500 sheets of paper, regardless of size, weight, or grade.  However, many refer to wrapped paper groups as a ream, such 250 index stock, 100 specialty paper, etc.

November 2003, V2#11: Production Saturday, Jan 17 2009 

Digital/POD

Once the digital manuscript has cleared pre-press it is ready for production.  The file or files are sent to the digital machine directly from the front office computers.  The book block is printed out already collated.  Depending on the size of the book and publication quantity, the digital files may be printed out in smaller page sequences and hand collated in preparation for binding.  Additionally, special items such as 4-color, slick inserts and card dividers are added by hand as well – as required.

January 2009, V8#1: Design Thursday, Jan 8 2009 

Layout your work

Basic layout formats include a single block/column and two columns of the same width for books. Generally books no larger than 8.5×11″ don’t have more than two columns because it is rarely economical. Depending on your content and format selections, the question of economics for one and two column may change.

Basic design elements that will be on nearly every page:

  • header

  • footer

  • page numbers

  • font style(s)

  • font size(s)

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design/layout.html
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June 2008, V7#6: Computer Saturday, Jan 3 2009 

MS Office – Format Paint

A good thing (in my book) is when you can get away with setting variables once and not having to do it again. To that end, I bring up the “format paint” option.
 
If you have a paragraph (or several) that are formatted just right and one (or more) that are not. Try using format paint:
Format Paint Illustration
Place your cursor in a paragraph that is formatted great.
Go up and click the button, just right of “paste”.
Next, highlight all the text you want formatted properly. This should make the highlighted text format correctly as you have “painted” it with the great format.
This doesn’t work with all formatting items, especially the advanced ones, but it does most everything found on the formatting tool bar – font size, type, underline, etc.
 
The paint only works for the next cursor placement. If you want to repeat the format paint – such as changing the person headline on each page, double click the format paint button. Everywhere your cursor highlights will reflect the new format until you either hit your Esc key, or double click the paint button again.

August 2003, V2#8: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Almost all programs will allow you to adjust the font size to some extent or another.  Production programs such as Acrobat, FrontPage, Print Artist, Publisher, Excel, Corel Draw, etc. usually give the most control.  Internet programs (with the exception of outgoing html email) are a bit different.

The Rule of Thumb: always look at your pull down menus!  Most programs have a menu that has to do with viewing or formatting (many times both).  Click them to see if there are font changing options.

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