April 2009, V8#4: Design Monday, Apr 6 2009 

There is no “silver bullet” for proper publication design or format. However, there are some very basic rules to get you ready to go:

Some basic ideas to make your publication special (some ideas for Hardbound {HB} or Sofbound {SB} only)

  • Use colored paper (to match cover) as section dividers.

  • Use clipart or stock photography to liven up pages where you don’t have personal items.

  • Do add other things besides text.

  • Place information you might otherwise place on the endpapers (HB) or inside of cover (SB) as the frontice piece and the last printed page in the book for economy.

  • Add a CD or DVD of extra material – even color photos for printed b/w in book.

  • HB: Match your end papers to the cover (main) color.

  • HB: Use custom printed end sheets (end papers).

  • HB: If offered, use stock pre-printed end papers such as marbleized, etc.

  • HB: Consider dust jackets versus color covers.

  • SB: Print on the inside of the cover.

  • Post Publication: Hand number (or stamp) each book.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design

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March 2009, V8#3: Design Monday, Mar 2 2009 

There is no “silver bullet” for proper publication design or format. However, there are some very basic rules to get you ready to go:

Basic design elements to consider

  • header

  • footer

  • page numbers

  • font style(s)

  • font size(s)

  • chapter/section treatments

  • general page layout

  • foot/end note treatment

  • index treatment and layout

  • title

  • reverse of title (verso)

  • binding

  • Electronic?

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This section is drawn from www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design

July 2006, V5#7: Production Tuesday, Feb 24 2009 

Hard Copy Manuscript

A good rule of thumb to keep in mind during the preparation process of a hard copy manuscript is “what you see, is what you get”. For the best results use a smooth white paper.  Expensive “top of the line” computer paper is not necessary, a good “typing” copy machine or all purpose paper is fine.  Avoid colored (cream, gray, etc.), aged colored and textured (pebbled, linen finish, etc.) as well as ultra thin (onionskin, etc.) papers. Make sure that the print is clear, consistent and as dark as possible throughout. In the end, you will be much happier if the typewriter or (non-Laser or DeskJet) printer used contains a carbon film ribbon, is in good mechanical working order and has clean unbroken strikers. More and more people are acquiring Laser or Bubble Jet/DeskJet printers and these make a very nice camera ready manuscript. In good faith, we can not recommend manual typewriters, fabric ribbons, dot matrix printers or low quality  DeskJet/Bubble Jet printers  for a good finished product. Electric typewriters, daisy wheel or ball printers and laser or Bubble Jet/DeskJet printers (on high quality settings) can be borrowed or rented in most areas.

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This section is drawn from http://www.gregathcompany.com/udo.html  

February 2009, V8#2: Design Monday, Feb 16 2009 

There is no “silver bullet” for proper publication design or format. However, there are some very basic rules to get you ready to go:

Don’t

  • Don’t do anything in your book that you hate to come across, as a reader or a researcher.

  • Don’t over clutter pages, often trying to reduce publication expense.

  • Don’t use small type if you want older people to enjoy your work.

  • Don’t give up.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design

February 2004, V3#2: Production Monday, Jan 26 2009 

All production processes (of any type) have waste, one figure listed recently in a trade publication places destroyed pieces of projects at 5-10%, we generally are much lower.  This is why many publishers/printers employ the 10% rule (if you order 100, you may receive – and pay for – 110 or only 90).  When you order 200 from us, we actually produce more then what it would take to produce 200 books from the beginning to be sure of delivering  200.  If more than 200 are actually produced in the end, the author/customer has the option of purchasing them or the are destroyed at no additional cost to the author/customer.

June 2003, V2#6: Genealogy Saturday, Jan 3 2009 

Basic research rule that is most commonly overlooked – no matter how much material you check, keep a record of what you have checked.

Basic research rule that is almost as most commonly overlooked – cite your sources.  Make sure when you locate a document, reference, or listing that you take detailed information about not only what reference you were using, but where and when it was found.

Keep these rules in mind and your search may be a much more orderly and enjoyable experience :o)

December 2002, V1#4: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Let’s revisit the SPAM problem.  In past issues we pointed out how to block a sender.  But what about all those folks who are sending from new addresses daily that are cluttering your inbox?  You may want to apply a filter (a.k.a. message rule) or two to help manage what arrives.  NOTE: This is also handy to pre-sort much of your mail.

So much SPAM is not addressed directly to you and the aid below will shunt these junk e-mails away from your inbox:

Load the program and click the pull down menu “tools” then drop your mouse down onto “message rules”, this reveals a second menu out of which you will (slide over staying on message rules) click “mail”.  When a box appears you are going to click the “new” button on the right side of the box.  This brings up a new box that helps you set your rule/filter. in the first window you are going to click the rule “where the to line contains people”  this adds the rule to the bottom window.  In the second/middle window I suggest you choose “move it to the specified folder”.  Next you are going to click the link in the bottom window (that has your new rule) “contains people”.  This brings up a box that you need to add all of the e-mail addresses (alias’s) that you have coming into this box. Once all of your e-mails are in, click that box’s OK button.  Next, choose the “specified” link in the bottom window.  This will bring up a box showing your e-mail program’s structure.  I suggest you make a filter file and select it then click OK.  This will bring you back to the “new mail rule” box with your completed rule showing in the bottom window – click OK.  Now, with the remaining box, click the “apply now” button and then OK.  This will take any e-mail that is not addressed directly to you (including if you were a CC) and place it directly into your filter file.  As you have time, clean out your filter file by blocking the SPAM and addressing any hapless emails that got caught there.  My suggestion is to clean your filter no less than once a week.