June 2006, V5#6: Production Friday, Jan 30 2009 

ISBN

The inclusion of an International Standard Book Number in your book design, places you in the “Books in Print” reference series, available in print and online from many different places. Additionally, this places the book in the database that most large chain bookstores and many smaller book shops use to special order titles. This is a way to get Barnes & Noble and Books-A-Million to carry the book without loosing inventory control. If an author has their own ISBN, they fill these orders directly. Generally, if a publisher ISBN is used, a copy or two stays with the publisher to fill these orders.

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March 2005, V4#3: Marketing Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Marketing is promotion!  To promote a book, good things about the book contents, yourself, your family (if genealogy) or area (if research tool), and history, as well at the physical form the book takes will be pointed out. These are all selling points.  Don’t overlook something that is positive because it wasn’t the main publishing focus.  For instance, archival quality is becoming a much talked about and sought after element in reference book publishing.  Whether this was of high priority for the author personally, it may contribute to sales if it is publicized.

April 2004, V3#4: Production Tuesday, Jan 27 2009 

Mixed Media Books: Authors who have opted for a traditionally printed book should not overlook the possibility of including additional material on CD with their books.  This can be done totally separately or with an envelope (or spindle) affixed to the book itself (generally inside the back cover).  The author can include files of anything that was “cut” from the book, more reference, further stories & details, links to favorite places, artwork, GEDCOM, etc.

May 2003, V2#5: Design Sunday, Jan 11 2009 

An index adds two valuable things to any book. The index makes the book easier to use and adds to its marketability.  Almost everyone has their own idea what a complete index is.  We suggest at least a complete surname index for genealogical books.  Content and format is up to you!

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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/tips.html 

August 2005, V4#8: Genealogy Tuesday, Jan 6 2009 

A lot of LDS research resources are available through local LDS Churches.  “Stake Libraries” in your local LDS family history center can order any microfilm available in Salt Lake City +++  All this, without having to sit in front of your computer all day.

September 2004, V3#9: Genealogy Sunday, Jan 4 2009 

Many people when researching forget to use reference materials in concert.  While this sounds strange, sometimes it doesn’t even cross their minds.  Example: Found the ancestor in the census but that year doesn’t have everything you want (or you prefer more than one documented source) – look in other state, county, and local records as well as local newspapers.  Could they have belonged to a local church or (fraternal) organization?  Don’t leave these out of the search!

June 2003, V2#6: Genealogy Saturday, Jan 3 2009 

Basic research rule that is most commonly overlooked – no matter how much material you check, keep a record of what you have checked.

Basic research rule that is almost as most commonly overlooked – cite your sources.  Make sure when you locate a document, reference, or listing that you take detailed information about not only what reference you were using, but where and when it was found.

Keep these rules in mind and your search may be a much more orderly and enjoyable experience :o)

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