March, 2014 Electronic Magazine – Computer Tuesday, May 20 2014 

Are you someone who is finally getting comfortable with Microsoft Word? Do you not have access to Publisher, or not ready to learn its interface, but want some of the templates? Word isn’t as easy to use to produce finished pieces, however, more templates are available to download from http://www.office.com – more FAX sheets, invoices, newsletters, calendars, etc.

June 2006, V5#6: Production Friday, Jan 30 2009 

ISBN

The inclusion of an International Standard Book Number in your book design, places you in the “Books in Print” reference series, available in print and online from many different places. Additionally, this places the book in the database that most large chain bookstores and many smaller book shops use to special order titles. This is a way to get Barnes & Noble and Books-A-Million to carry the book without loosing inventory control. If an author has their own ISBN, they fill these orders directly. Generally, if a publisher ISBN is used, a copy or two stays with the publisher to fill these orders.

December 2005, V4#12: Production Thursday, Jan 29 2009 

A Little About Archival Quality

External Factors Beyond Production

If the books are shipped from the publisher to the author, the heat of summer or the cold of winter will subject the books to extremes in temperature. Humidity can become a factor, even before the books are sold, especially in the summer in the south.  Books stored where light from a window falls on them directly subjects them to harmful UV.  Highly urban areas may have high air pollution that could affect the books. Skin itself (body oil, sweat, finger food grease, etc.), from the reader, can adversely affect the book, as well.  The list can go on and on…

August 2005, V4#8: Design Thursday, Jan 29 2009 

Bleeds
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When planning a book, one may need to consider whether to incorporate bleeds into the project.  If economy is a factor, the answer to the question is to achieve your ascetic goal some other way.  Work with your publisher on this factor is bleeds are really a high priority.  Sometimes impression area can be stretched to the point that by the time the binding trim has been taken the book looks like it was planned with bleeds – but economically, the underwriter avoided a costly option.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/udo.html

May 2005, V4#5: Design Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Too many choices to decide?  Consider choosing a color (scheme) that matches a favorite color, allow the publisher to select something, or take the color (scheme) from family crest or tartan.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/bindings.html

March 2005, V4#3: Design Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

If archival quality is important to the author, they should take a moment and define what exactly is important to them and why.  After this is complete, they can begin seeking printer/publishers and/or methods for their book production.  Always query about definition of archival words and jargon as they seem to vary widely – never assume.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/bookselling.html

November 2004, V3#11: Design Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

ISBN stands for International Standard Book Number and is usually associated with the barcode on the back of books.  This number is assigned to a publication from the “publisher’s” prefix group – ultimately from R. R. Bowker – http://www.bowker.com.  A number only applies to the publication from that publisher in that format only.  In other words, if you have an ISBN on a hardbound book, your softbound edition can’t use the same number.  Some printers have numbers that can either be used for free, or for a small fee for publications.  Additionally, regardless of who produces the book, you can purchase your own block of numbers.  This may help if you don’t plan to stay with the same production company.  If you use printer A’s ISBN for the first edition and for your second printing use printer B – you can not use printer A’s ISBN on the second edition.  For more information, check out Bowker’s site above.  An ISBN barcode may be required if you wish your book to be carried in some bookstores.

November 2003, V2#11: Design Saturday, Jan 17 2009 

Once you’ve decided to include photographs, check with your printer/publisher as to the procedure they want you to use.  This can be done before or after you choose the exact photos.  We request authors arrange pictures on each page for placement, and copy the page (to help make sure there are no mistakes later). Photos (or print outs) should remain unattached to the page (or to each other), with placement and page ID on reverse of the photo. Example: 3 photos on page 23 marked/IDed 23a, 23b, and 23c. Post-It notes are becoming popular for this type of identification. The manuscript page should have identical photo placement notations. All photos should be grouped and placed in the top of the manuscript box, before sending to the printer. If applicable, be sure to specify what is the most important subject when alterations are required. IF you are providing the half-tones, they should be trimmed and affixed to (or produced/saved as part of) the manuscript page, as a part of the camera ready manuscript,  to avoid additional expense.  

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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/tips.html

June 2003, V2#6: Marketing Sunday, Jan 11 2009 

One can choose to have a press release, or do a press kit.  A press kit can contain:

*a photo of the author, the book, etc.
*a sheet about the book itself.
*a sheet about the author.
*a sheet about why the book is being published.
*a sheet about the publisher.
*a sheet about purchasing.
*a calendar of planned events important to the book such as signing party, etc.
*any other promotional material you can think of

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This section is drawn from our marketing page at http://www.gregathcompany.com/marketing.html 

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