February 2016 E-Zine: Complete Monday, Feb 1 2016 

Design Inspiration
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At the earliest, as you complete your manuscript, you should begin thinking about what editions you will be publishing in. Estimated page count, target usage, and type of binding may dictate different maximum page margins for traditionally printed books. Depending on the software options (index, end/foot note, etc.) you use to produce your work separate manuscript files for each edition may be needed. Preliminary work for electronic edition may be done in a word processing application followed by a straight conversion (such as PDF) or export for more work done in a program geared to produce electronic publication manuscripts.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design/layout.html
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Book Manufacturing Concepts
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Using Microsoft Publisher, Adobe InDesign (or other program of this type)? While it is easy to place frames and objects outside of your established margins and even running off the edge of the page (full bleed), remember margins are necessary to produce a page pleasing to the eye and many forms of standard printing do not allow for no margin or bleed printing. Always place all elements, unless previously discussed with your publisher, within your established margins.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/info/tips/selfmanuscript.html
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Marketing advice
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In the 21st century Social Networking is not going away. Where you may have “pressed the flesh” and been active in organizations to network in the past (thus getting the word out on your current and past projects), getting involved in the online community can be great if your marketing is “grass roots” based. Don’t go crazy – it will just result in more stress about learning something new: Learn about your options, join one at a time and monitor a bit before making it a marketing platform. In this way, if the interface or tone doesn’t seem right for you, you won’t gain followers you’ll abandon if you discontinue.

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Genealogy ideas – this issue marketing applies to genealogy as well.
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Have a tip? e-mail us
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Computer aid!?! – see Design Inspiration this issue.

July 2009: V8#7: Genealogy Friday, Jul 3 2009 

The State Library of Ohio and Ohio Historical Society are pleased to
announce the March 2nd launch of the Ohio Memory – Next Generation
website (http://www.ohiomemory.org). The website,
a redesign of the Ohio Memory project, features 75,000 historical images
and information from 330 archives, historical societies, libraries and
museums.  The new site has been improved to make it easier to find and
contribute images, information, and documents. Users can search and
browse all collections or an individual collection by subject, place or
contributor.

“People are used to one-stop shopping and retrieval of information.  The
new website allows users to find documents, portraits, and photographs
on any given subject quickly and easily,” said State Librarian Jo
Budler.  “It is wonderful that our partnership with the Ohio Historical
Society allowed us to move our collections to a new and improved
platform.” 

The Ohio Memory – Next Generation site is a collaborative project of the
State Library of Ohio and Ohio Historical Society. In addition to all of
the resources on the original website, the State Library has contributed
part of its Ohio documents digital collection that includes a vast
selection of publications produced on the web by state agencies.  The
publications include many annual reports, health and population
statistics, natural resources guides and pamphlets including: Trails for
Ohioans a plan for the future
http://cdm267401.cdmhost.com/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/p267401ccp2
&CISOPTR=1621&REC=7
, 20 Questions to ask a lender or mortgage
broker
http://cdm267401.cdmhost.com/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/p267401ccp2
&CISOPTR=822&REC=1
, and 2006 population estimates for cities,
villages
& townships
http://cdm267401.cdmhost.com/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/p267401ccp2
&CISOPTR=2367&REC=2
.

“We are beginning to scan print materials from our rare Ohio state
government collection.  The staff is scanning annual reports from the
1800s to early 1900s.  Current titles include:  Annual Report of the
Ohio Soldiers’ and Sailors Orphans’ Home; Ohio Institution for the
Education of the Deaf and Dumb; and Annual Reports of Longview
Hospital,” said Jim Buchman, head of Patron & Catalog Services at the
State Library of Ohio. “These publications include rosters of
individuals and will be of interest to the genealogy community.” For
example, a recently scanned document is the Known military dead during
the Spanish American War and the Philippines Insurrection, 1898-1901
http://cdm267401.cdmhost.com/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/p267401ccp2
&CISOPTR=3306&REC=3

Ohio Memory began as a state bicentennial project in 2000 to build a
searchable database of digital images celebrating Ohio’s history.
Hundreds of historical societies, museums and libraries from all over
Ohio contributed more than 25,000 images to the project.  The collection
continues to grow. “The [new] site increases access to Ohio’s past and
the individual stories that make up the fabric of our nation’s and
Ohio’s history,” said Angela O’Neil, manager of Preservation and
Access Services at the Ohio Historical Society.

The Ohio Memory project was originally funded by the Ohio Public Library
Information Network, Ohio Bicentennial Commission and a federal
Institute for Museum and Library Services/Library Services Technology
Act grant awarded by the State Library of Ohio.

For more information contact Jim Buchman, Head Patron & Catalog
Services, State Library of Ohio: jbuchman@sloma.state.oh.us

From the Librarians Serving Genealogists E-List
Submitted by Marsha McDevitt-Stredney

February 2009, V8#2: Genealogy Monday, Feb 16 2009 

Web Site Lists Missing World War II Soldiers

Approximately 74,000 World War II soldiers have not had their remains recovered or identified.  In an attempt to aid in the recovery and identification process, the Missing Personnel World War II database was created.  The database is online at www.dtic.mil/dpmo/WWII_MIA/index.htm.  This first-ever comprehensive list is a project of the Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office and was completed in 2004. 

The database was created by comparing and analyzing two sources:  “Rosters of Military Personnel Whose Remains Were Not Recovered” and “The World War II Rosters of the Dead.”  All discrepancies were settled by using the National Archives and official personnel files.  The database contains the name of the missing soldier, service number, rank, branch of service and the date of loss. 

The accounting for missing World War II service members is an ongoing project.  As remains are recovered and identified, their names are removed from the database. 

When the war ended in August 1945, over 79,000 known soldiers were unaccounted for.  This number included individuals buried as “unknown” lost at sea and missing in action. 

There are similar databases for those missing from the Korean War, the Cold War, Vietnam and the Gulf War.  More information and access to these databases are found at www.dtic.mil/dpmo.

This information was taken from Paul Follett’s column Tree Tracers published in the Lawton Constitution on April 21, 2008 – via SWOGS.

November 2005, V4#11: Marketing Thursday, Jan 29 2009 

Using your contact information, follow up your initial press release with subsequent releases such as a report on sales, family gatherings, signing party, new projects, special offers/sales (holiday free shipping, contributor/family discount), etc.

August 2005, V4#8: Design Thursday, Jan 29 2009 

Bleeds
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When planning a book, one may need to consider whether to incorporate bleeds into the project.  If economy is a factor, the answer to the question is to achieve your ascetic goal some other way.  Work with your publisher on this factor is bleeds are really a high priority.  Sometimes impression area can be stretched to the point that by the time the binding trim has been taken the book looks like it was planned with bleeds – but economically, the underwriter avoided a costly option.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/udo.html

December 2004: V3#12: Marketing Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

As the holiday season progresses, we’d like to take the time to remind everyone that a report on the book project in all of your holiday correspondence can increase interest and donated materials.

October 2004, V3#10: Marketing Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

You may choose to have matching stationery – including cards, invoices, inserts, etc.  This provides you and your project(s) visibility and product recognition.  If you incorporate your project(s) into your stationery and add a card or bookmark to all correspondence, you never know what interest you may pick up.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/marketing.html

April 2003, V2#4: Marketing Friday, Jan 9 2009 

Prepare (and send) press releases to all media (newspaper, radio, TV, etc.) within the area as you are completing work on the manuscript, again when they are being published, and after to cover such events as signing parties, etc.

May 2004, V3#5: Genealogy Sunday, Jan 4 2009 

Though you are probably already using US Gen Web Project (see previous tip), have you added your query/queries to the email lists that correspond geographically to your problem area(s)?  To get started, go to the county in question.  We suggest you then subscribe to their email list (see below for definition).  If you prefer not to, email the county coordinator with your query and request it be added to the email list.

September 2002, V1#1: Book Production Wednesday, Dec 24 2008 

While the world in general accepts that there are several main ways to reproduce books (i.e. print or copy), very few methods to produce printed books are alike.  Each print shop can employ not only a variety of presses and methods, but there are so many steps that are possible that the term “printed” doesn’t really describe much once you start thinking about it. Due to the fact that a copied book production is so automated, once you determine the type of copier and quality of binding, you have a much better idea of what your book will look like.  In future issues, we will discuss our production methods.  We hope by doing this, you may have some idea of what actually goes into the production of a book.  Once you have grasped some of what is involved, you can go to any printer/publisher that wants to work with clients on a personal basis and ask for a tour or explanation of their processes in reference to your book project.