August 2007, V6#8: Genealogy Wednesday, Jan 7 2009 

Have you checked out PERSI lately? It is available through HeritageQuest. While this is a subscription program, many libraries with strong genealogy programs allow access on site, and some do from your home. More about PERSI from the Allen County Public Library (http://www.acpl.lib.in.us/genealogy/persi.html):

“The Periodical Source Index, or PERSI, is the largest subject index to genealogical and historical periodical articles in the world. Created by the foundation and department staff of the Genealogy Center of the library here in Fort Wayne, Indiana, PERSI is widely recognized as being a vital source for genealogical researchers.

PERSI is a comprehensive subject index covering genealogy and local history periodicals written in English and French (Canada) since 1800. The time period of the articles ranges from the 1700s to the present. More than 1.8 million index entries from nearly ten thousand titles are represented by this work.

If you are in one of the fourteen Allen County Public Library facilities, you may search the PERSI resource by clicking on “E-Resources” on the main webpage <www.ACPL.Info> and scrolling down to “HeritageQuestOnline.” Clicking on that link and then choosing the “Search PERSI” option with open the index for you. If you do not live in Allen County, IN, check with your local library about the availability of HeritageQuestOnline in your area.”

Advertisements

March 2006, V5#3: Genealogy Tuesday, Jan 6 2009 

Always be sure to double check with your library to see if they participate in an inter-library loan program. Many books/microform, etc. you may be interested in researching from may be available through one of these programs. Many libraries do ask for payment to help defray postage for this service.

March 2008, V7#3: Computer Tuesday, Dec 30 2008 

In MS Word, some files look different “on the page” in the computer. What causes this?

It’s called page view. Yes, you can set your program to show you the pages in different ways. It’s easy once you know how. Look down the screen to near the start button – where there are several “lines” of gray “stuff” before you see the bottom edge of the document. At the top left of all of this gray are 4 buttons before the side-to-side scroll bar starts. The page view with the dotted line to show page break is called “normal” and it is that far left button (depressed) – the arrow below is pointing to these buttons:
v711

To see how the other 3 views work, position a file where you can see the page break and just left click each button in turn. Besides normal view, I sometimes like print view which is the third button from the left, as it shows me virtual sheets of paper with the correct margins and page number too. – CAC

December 2007, V6#12: Computer Tuesday, Dec 30 2008 

Not sure if files written in MS Office 2007 are compatible? The truth is that they are with a bit of work on your part. If you are running an older version of a program and try to open the 2007 file, it will prompt you do download a conversion program. If you are online, follow all directions – including downloading other updates first. Your computer can then convert the 2007 file to something your computer can work with. Word of warning though, if the file contains features that became available in 2007, your converted file won’t have them.

August 2007, V6#8: Computer Tuesday, Dec 30 2008 

Always having trouble with your computer? Have you checked to see if there is a computer support group you can join locally? Our society has lots of different groups for lots of different interests and to solve problems. If there is not one in your area, look at banding together friends and family who have difficulties and successes. Not everyone will have the same problems, or the same successes. While you may always be asking your group questions, you might find yourself the “go to” person for general problems in a program you always work in.

“It takes a village…”

March 2007, V6#3: Computer Tuesday, Dec 30 2008 

(part 4)

Economical suggestion for purchase: Look to closeouts or ask staff members if they have any of the older versions available, at a discount, in stores. Alternately, you can usually buy older versions of software reasonably through eBay. Just be sure that the software is XP/Vista compatible – and through eBay comes with any books, etc.

February 2007, V6#2: Computer Tuesday, Dec 30 2008 

What software to use? (part 3)

Especially if you have some experience with Microsoft software, one might consider buying Microsoft Office (instead of single particular program), which will include Word, a spreadsheet/database program, usually a webpage program, and sometimes Publisher. This is a long range planning consideration – especially if you are looking toward being a life-long author. Not every book project will be well suited to a single program. Transcriptions, and columnar data works very well in Excel. This data can be sorted, rearranged and selectively inserted into a Word manuscript – all without having to retype.

January 2007, V6#1: Computer Tuesday, Dec 30 2008 

What software to use? (part 2)

If you are looking for a “desktop typewriter”, almost any word processing software will do. If you have a Microsoft Window based system, you have WordPad. This is a very basic program, but if you aren’t interested in any bells and whistles (such as spell check, etc.), it is fairly easy to learn and operate. If you don’t have a MS Windows based system, or want to look at something else, there are many shareware programs available at little or no cost.

December 2006, V5#12: Computer Saturday, Dec 27 2008 

99.9% of the books we produce are from Microsoft Word. However, it will depend on what the focus of your book is, as well as what software you are familiar with, and how much work you want the software to do for you. For instance, if the book is to contain many charts, a program that is geared toward generating these charts would be important. If you are working toward mainly fact oriented and are hoping the program will organize a manuscript, a program such as Family Tree Maker might be best. If you are looking for word processing and are familiar with the Corel family of products, you may not want to learn Microsoft Office. If you are wanting to go with fancy margins, clip art, photos, charts, tables, graphic elements on each page, etc., Microsoft Publisher may be the way to go. The bottom line, like so many other decisions comes down to you. It’s hard to beat making a wish list (I want the program to be able to…) and then looking for a product that fits best. Other factors, besides current software knowledge may be cost for new software, compatibility (if looking toward a hybrid or e-book).

Overall software we utilize most (remember, this doesn’t mean they are the best for you):

Manuscript: Microsoft Word (other Office programs such as Excel, Access, Publisher, and FrontPage can be helpful or used with Word, depending on project.)

Photographs: Adobe Photoshop

“Genealogy” Program (Charts, etc.): Family Tree Maker

August 2006, V5#8: Computer Saturday, Dec 27 2008 

Does it seem like every document or web page you open has smaller text then the last? If your mouse of choice has a wheel (“wheel mouse”), you may be in luck. In at least Microsoft Word and Internet Explorer, this trick works like a dream (most of the time): When you want to see the text larger on a page or document you are viewing, be sure your mouse pointer is somewhere on the “page” in question, hold down your control key and move your wheel away from you (while holding the mouse still). This should zoom the text in direct relation to how far you move the wheel. The reverse is true if moving the wheel toward you. Try this in your favorite program – it might work there too!

« Previous PageNext Page »