August 2005, V4#8: Define Thursday, Jan 29 2009 

Bleed: A printed image that extends beyond the trim edge of a sheet of paper.

Advertisements

July 2005, V4#7: Production Thursday, Jan 29 2009 

Paper opacity is the lack of transparency that allows a sheet to conceal print on the opposite side.  weight, brightness, type of fiber and filler in testing can all greatly influence opacity.  Reflectance of paper is measured when backed successfully by a white body and a black body.  The ratio of these two measurements determines the opacity reading.  Typical opacity of 50# white offset is 88-90; 20# business paper is 84-88.  A quick and very basic “home” test is to print something large and black (black and white clip art and or various sized of bolded text) on a sheet of paper, place a blank sheet of the paper to be tested over this printed sheet.  Any print that happens to show through, will show a bit more if actually printed on the currently black paper.  For book printing, take your darkest page and try this test.  Many manuscript designers will change their manuscript elements to decrease the opacity needed for a nice book rather than pay the difference for higher opacity.

July 2005, V4#7: Define Thursday, Jan 29 2009 

*Backbone: Center edge of a book perpendicular to and between its covers.

*Backing up: Printing a sheet after one side has already been printed.

* = general jargon that it not standard lingo at The Gregath Publishing Company

May 2005, V4#5: Production Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Paper Grain Direction:  All papers have a grain direction.  When the grain runs along the longest dimension of the sheet, the paper is “long grain”.  Grain is seldom a factor in offset printing, however it is a major consideration in binding.  Binderies prefer long grain since paper offers the least resistance in the same direction as most fibers in a sheet.  Also, pages in books tend to lie flat better when they are made with, rather than against the grain.  For saddle stitched books, a stronger book is produced with long grain, due to the fold being across the grain, but it doesn’t lay as flat.  Short grain paper is has difficulty maintaining dimensional stability and may result in more book problems such as wrinkled pages, etc.

March 2005, V4#3: Production Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Q. Will my book be archival and/or acid free?

A. It depends on how technical your definitions of acid free and/or archival are. This webpage has been provided for further education. Short Answer:  Our books meet several standards and are considered by many to be acid free. 

We utilize the offset printing method and/or digital copying and a variety of binding processes. These methods add a small percentage of acidic material while printing on any paper. We have yet to find any publishing process that is totally (100%) acid free, even if printed on high cotton (or “rag”) content, acid free paper. Additionally, the first bare hand that touches any acid free material also introduces acid to it.  However, by Gregath’s use of pH balanced paper (commonly referred to as “acid free”), your book will be over 99% acid free and will last for several decades – depending upon the owner’s treatment of the book.

-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-
This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/archival.html

November 2004, V3#11: Define Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Plates: In printing, a plate is made from the original manuscript page. The plate is then used on the offset press to re-produce the page. In binding, a plate is made of any artwork for stamping covers.

February 2004, V3#2: Production Monday, Jan 26 2009 

All production processes (of any type) have waste, one figure listed recently in a trade publication places destroyed pieces of projects at 5-10%, we generally are much lower.  This is why many publishers/printers employ the 10% rule (if you order 100, you may receive – and pay for – 110 or only 90).  When you order 200 from us, we actually produce more then what it would take to produce 200 books from the beginning to be sure of delivering  200.  If more than 200 are actually produced in the end, the author/customer has the option of purchasing them or the are destroyed at no additional cost to the author/customer.

February 2004, V3#2: Define Monday, Jan 26 2009 

Offset Printing: A photo-duplicate of each page – achieved through the use of a plate made from an the original.
-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-
For other printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossary at http://www.gregathcompany.com/gloss.html

August 2003, V2#8: Production Sunday, Jan 11 2009 

Offset printing versus digital printing

When delving into the world of digital reproduction/printing, (family) historians should be sure exactly what they are paying for.  A large percentage of “digital print” that is being published is simply being produced on a digital based copy machine.  While today’s digital machines (of any type) are much better than the copy machines even 15 years ago, this format hasn’t been tested by time.  Much like any E-book format you can get today – it cannot be considered archival quality because of this.  There are some true digital printing presses – accepted and tested printing processes that receive their printable image directly from a computer rather than plate, film, or other media.  These are as archival as their printing process that has been tested over time.

December 2002, V1#4: Define Friday, Jan 9 2009 

Check-in (pre-press): Procedure all manuscripts go through when they are received for printing (optional for companion program) – photo pages, pagination confirmed, margins spot checked – includes general inspection for any unforeseen factors that would affect cost or quality of book.

« Previous Page