New Ottawa County, Oklahoma Book Tuesday, Feb 28 2012 

Hot off the Presses!

Now available for sale,  Fredas L. Cook’s latest published book in his ongoing effort to preserve history as well as make it accessible:

Newspaper Microfilm Mining in Northern Ottawa County, Oklahoma, Volume 1, by Fredas L. Cook, 2012. 174 pages, 8.5×11″, softbound book, ISBN 978-1-936091-20-1. This first volume of a new series contains information from The Commerce News (1916), The Douthit Independent (1917), The Quapaw World (1917-1918), and The Quapaw Mining Herald (1919) and contains lots of information allowing a glimpse into life in northeast Oklahoma just after the turn of the nineteenth century. This fully indexed book encompasses everything from family information to advertisements and talk about the weather!

Gregath Order Information AD2444-$30.00

Click here for book information page from publisher.

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September 2006, V5#9: Genealogy Tuesday, Jan 6 2009 

Every Genealogist Needs a Will by Frederick E. Moss, J.D., LL.M
Do you have a current will?  We may not all have extensive property or possessions to dispose of but there are other benefits that can be realized by expressing our desires through a last will and testament.  If you have minor children, you may suggest a more appropriate guardian than a court might appoint in the absence of your direction.  If you nominate an executor you can trust, you may reduce the expenses taken out of your estate by waiving bond and accounting.  These and other measures your attorney may suggest can insure that taxes and other charges are minimized that would otherwise reduce the estate available to your intended beneficiaries.
 Genealogists may have come to appreciate the value of wills as a source of information to future generations.  Lawyers will normally include the basic information declaring the testator’s name and domicile and will address the testator’s wishes for the disposition of his property to named beneficiaries.  Our legal training will not always direct our attention to the information-sharing and preservation opportunity that the drafting of a will provides.

Discuss with your lawyer the possibility of including what I have called a three-generation declaration similar to the following:

 
“I, Joseph Abraham Moss, was born the 23d day of January 1853 in Gordon County, Georgia the son of Johnson Moss and the former Sarah Caroline Love.  I married Charlotte Jane Roberson, the daughter of Thomas Howery Roberson and the former Emaline Lewis, on the 5th day of January 1873 in Crawford County, Arkansas.  Our son, Thomas Johnson Moss was born the 8th day of December 1875 in Crawford County, Arkansas.  Our son, James Monroe Moss was born the 26th day of September 1876 in Crawford County, Arkansas. Our daughter, Sarah Emaline Moss was born the 27th day of September 1878 in Crawford County, Arkansas.  Our daughter, Mary Inez Moss was born the 30th day of March 1880 in Crawford County, Arkansas. . . .”
 
There may be circumstances where it may be inappropriate to go into this level of detail and you should do so only with special care for insuring the accuracy of the information provided.  Although wills become public records when admitted to probate upon the death of the testator, triggering our sensitivities about publishing data on living individuals, the limited distribution these papers normally receive minimizes the risk of abuse.  
 
But if you do chose to do so, to paraphrase Proverbs, the genealogists among your great-grandchildren will rise up and call you blessed. 
From Federation of Genealogical Societies “FGS Delegate Digest”  Volume 13, No. 9, July 2006

February 2005, V4#2: Genealogy Sunday, Jan 4 2009 

If you or your family have been collecting documentation for quite sometime, you should consider replacing your copies that are over 20 years old.  As each copy loses clarity, it is suggested preservation photocopying should be considered to reduce the times the copy will need re-copied.  For more information visit the Library of Congress online.

July 2003, V2#7: Genealogy Saturday, Jan 3 2009 

While becoming that student of history we have already suggested, is your lost ancestor in America during the time the US was giving out free land to it’s citizens?  If so, your next stop should be the homestead records!  This little utilized collection of documents and information is housed at the national archives and has not been reproduced or indexed in any wide reaching way.  The Homestead National Monument has begun exploring the best way to augment NARA general paper preservation process by replicating them in Nebraska.