February 2016 E-Zine: Complete Monday, Feb 1 2016 

Design Inspiration
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At the earliest, as you complete your manuscript, you should begin thinking about what editions you will be publishing in. Estimated page count, target usage, and type of binding may dictate different maximum page margins for traditionally printed books. Depending on the software options (index, end/foot note, etc.) you use to produce your work separate manuscript files for each edition may be needed. Preliminary work for electronic edition may be done in a word processing application followed by a straight conversion (such as PDF) or export for more work done in a program geared to produce electronic publication manuscripts.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design/layout.html
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Book Manufacturing Concepts
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Using Microsoft Publisher, Adobe InDesign (or other program of this type)? While it is easy to place frames and objects outside of your established margins and even running off the edge of the page (full bleed), remember margins are necessary to produce a page pleasing to the eye and many forms of standard printing do not allow for no margin or bleed printing. Always place all elements, unless previously discussed with your publisher, within your established margins.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/info/tips/selfmanuscript.html
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Marketing advice
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In the 21st century Social Networking is not going away. Where you may have “pressed the flesh” and been active in organizations to network in the past (thus getting the word out on your current and past projects), getting involved in the online community can be great if your marketing is “grass roots” based. Don’t go crazy – it will just result in more stress about learning something new: Learn about your options, join one at a time and monitor a bit before making it a marketing platform. In this way, if the interface or tone doesn’t seem right for you, you won’t gain followers you’ll abandon if you discontinue.

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Genealogy ideas – this issue marketing applies to genealogy as well.
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Have a tip? e-mail us
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Computer aid!?! – see Design Inspiration this issue.

New information online about electronic books and their formats Wednesday, May 22 2013 

Some electronic book manuscript preparation and marketing has been moved around on our website, as well as an added section on electronic format manuscript preparation.

July 2006, V5#7: Production Tuesday, Feb 24 2009 

Hard Copy Manuscript

A good rule of thumb to keep in mind during the preparation process of a hard copy manuscript is “what you see, is what you get”. For the best results use a smooth white paper.  Expensive “top of the line” computer paper is not necessary, a good “typing” copy machine or all purpose paper is fine.  Avoid colored (cream, gray, etc.), aged colored and textured (pebbled, linen finish, etc.) as well as ultra thin (onionskin, etc.) papers. Make sure that the print is clear, consistent and as dark as possible throughout. In the end, you will be much happier if the typewriter or (non-Laser or DeskJet) printer used contains a carbon film ribbon, is in good mechanical working order and has clean unbroken strikers. More and more people are acquiring Laser or Bubble Jet/DeskJet printers and these make a very nice camera ready manuscript. In good faith, we can not recommend manual typewriters, fabric ribbons, dot matrix printers or low quality  DeskJet/Bubble Jet printers  for a good finished product. Electric typewriters, daisy wheel or ball printers and laser or Bubble Jet/DeskJet printers (on high quality settings) can be borrowed or rented in most areas.

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This section is drawn from http://www.gregathcompany.com/udo.html  

November 2002: V1#3: Book Design Wednesday, Dec 24 2008 

A good rule of thumb to keep in mind during time you are in preparation process (unless you are informed by your printer/publisher it is incorrect) is “what you see, is what you get”. For the best results use a smooth white paper.  Expensive “top of the line” computer paper is not necessary, a good “typing” copy machine or all purpose paper is fine.  Avoid colored (cream, gray, etc.), aged colored and textured (pebbled, linen finish, etc.) as well as ultra thin (onionskin, etc.) papers. Make sure that the print is clear, consistent and as dark as possible throughout. In the end, you will be much happier if the typewriter or (non laser or DeskJet) printer used contains a carbon film ribbon, is in good mechanical working order and has clean unbroken strikers. More and more people are acquiring laser or bubble jet/DeskJet printers and these make a very nice camera ready manuscript. In good faith, we can not recommend manual typewriters, fabric ribbons, dot matrix printers, or low quality DeskJet/bubble jet printers for a good finished product. Electric typewriters, daisy wheel or ball printers and laser or bubble jet/DeskJet printers (on high quality settings) can be borrowed or rented in most areas.