August 2015 Magazine – Define A-Z Monday, Aug 17 2015 

*Gang Shoot(ing): Several photographs to be included in the publication are placed together and halftoned at one time.  While many printers do this by shooting any photo “as they come” within the manuscript – this does not turn out well many times for very light and very dark photos.  This technique is often employed to reduce cost of photo.  Our new electronic halftoning process eliminates this need.

Gloss(y) paper: Paper that has been coated on one or both sides during paper production.  Some high gloss papers glare, making them difficult to read.  Additionally, gloss paper is generally expensive and can not be offset printed.

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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at
http://www.gregathcomany.com/info/dictionary and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/info/dictionary/writers.html

Run across a word that you don’t understand? Try us – email us your word, term or phrase and we will see if we can shed some light on the matter!

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August 2009, V8#8: Design Wednesday, Aug 5 2009 

Quality may be a factor in deciding whether to included a printed photo in a family book, but not always. Many authors are producing hybrid books so they don’t have to leave any photos out. This page contains some great ideas to be published by the Gregath Publishing Company to keep in mind.

Show your achievements, whatever they are – be they are military medals, trophies, etc. Captions are important as well.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/photo/tips/design

July 2009, V8#7: Design Friday, Jul 3 2009 

Photos and other special items:

Don’t overlook your photo layout when determining margins and what fits on a page. The photograph counts as the edge of the margin, just as headers, footers, text, and other graphics do. As we prepare digital manuscripts, it is easy to forget this as so many of our special items lay “over” or “under” the page that we have set margins for. Unless you are paying for a full bleed, laying items outside your set margin area can lead to books that have inadequate printing in the margins, broken spines as things run into the stitched binding, and unforeseen edge trims as the book block is trimmed to prepare for binding.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design/margins.html
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February 2005, V4#2: Marketing Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Include a photograph with any mailings (especially electronic): can be an action shot of the author writing or selling, or a special one from the book. If the book is already published, it could even be a “beauty shot” of the book itself.  Make sure to caption the photograph.  If it is from the book and the promotional material doesn’t address the photograph, the caption can be a bit longer to make sure you tie the photo to the book.

February 2005, V4#2: Production Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Include all your photos in a hybrid “printed” book: For the author that would also love to see every photo available in print – a book with accompanying CD may be the answer.  Select the “cream of the crop” to be printed into the actual book.  The CD – which can be attached to the book via envelope or spindle – can contain a wealth of digital information.  Photos galore and/or original document scans, GEDCOM files, author notes on theories, etc.

February 2005, V4#2: Design Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Photo thoughts: The author, will be the person with the final say as to what  goes into the printed book.  While many families would love to see every photo available in print, this is rarely economical.  Because of this, the author may have some major decisions on what “makes the cut”.  Final decisions should include not only the quality and subject of the photograph, which may effect the tone of the picture page, but also who is in the photo.  Economically, printed photographs will be black and white.  Since not everyone has an eye for what color photos will look like in black and white, the author may get an idea by converting it.  They can either digitize it and change the color file to grayscale, or place the photo on a b/w copy machine.  A color picnic picture in a sun dappled glade may seem perfect in composition, tone, and quality, but may not be a very good black and white.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://gregathcompany.com/udo.html

July 2004, V3#7: Define Tuesday, Jan 27 2009 

Photo (picture) page(s): Any page that includes a photo in the manuscript.

February 2005, V4#2: Define Monday, Jan 26 2009 

Photo (picture) page(s): Any page that includes a photo in the manuscript.

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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at http://gregathcompany.com/gloss.html and
http://gregathcompany.com/glosswrite.html

October 2003, V2#10: Production & Design Saturday, Jan 17 2009 

There are several real problems concerning reproducing pictures that authors may not be aware of. The very best reproduction processes lose some quality from the original. Some “antique” photos are sent to the printers that are barely discernible as pictures. These pictures should be taken to a professional restorer or computer graphic whiz (with a high quality photo quality printer), first. Remember that the printer can do many miracles with size, but most are not set up to restore faded photos. Any old, faded photos sent to the printer will only result in faded print and possibly disappointment.

If you are preparing a manuscript for publication, take a critical look at the pictures. Do they show the detail you want? Is there too much unwanted background? Are the faces too light? Too dark? In many cases, there are no better pictures of the subject and in some cases, no others at all. In these cases, the question is, Can they be enhanced? Quite often, the answer is yes! In most major cities, a trip to the yellow pages will find a photo restorer. When you have photos reproduced, compare them closely with the originals. Often the reproducer, to improve contrast, loses detail.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://gregathcompany.com/tips.html 

August 2003, V2#8: Design Sunday, Jan 11 2009 

We receive manuscripts, including pictures with the instructions “Do Not Cut Pictures”, every day. No printer that we know of would have any reason to cut your ORIGINAL pictures/submissions. In our printing process, a negative and a new print [known as a half-tone) must be made in order to be reproduced on an offset press. Many snapshots are of one or a few family members, with a whole lot of unnecessary background. Most of these pictures show very little, if any, detail of the subject. If they were enlarged and the half tone “cropped for effect”, the same size picture would show the subject(s) in much more detail.

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