March, 2014 Electronic Magazine – Genealogy Tuesday, May 20 2014 

Basic facts about ancestors found in many obituaries and death notices:

  1. Date of death, name of cemetery, date and place of funeral and burial
  2. Name, place and year of birth
  3. Names of children, where they lived, and their position in the family’s birth order
  4. Names of towns and how long they lived in each one
  5. Age of spouse at death and how along ago that was
  6. Details on the longevity of parents and grandparents
  7. count of descendants, by generation
  8. Much, Much, MORE!

Adapted from GenealogyBank’s 10-24-2012 e-newsletter

May 2003, V2#5: Genealogy Saturday, Jan 3 2009 

If you have a family story stating you are related to a certain person (Daniel Boon, Thomas Jefferson, King Henry VIII, etc.). but have not been able to get your research back in time past a certain ancestor, don’t fall into the “missing link” trap.  Many genealogists, especially those who have taken up research without any training or guidance will simply skip this lost ancestor and pick up research with who they “are sure” is this ancestor’s parents.  People have done untold research on other people’s families in this manner – not their own.  While it is tempting to try and “reverse engineer” the pedigree in this manner, it rarely works.

March 2003, V2#3: Genealogy Saturday, Jan 3 2009 

Though it is real easy, don’t fall into a “parent trap”.  While getting oral history including stories, dates, relations is an invaluable tool for the beginning genealogist (indeed, a great book starting activity), always take the time to obtain records for all information gained in this manner.  This record search can be something you do with the relative providing the information or independently.