September 2015 Ezine – Definitions Wednesday, Sep 2 2015 

Gripper Margin (*Grip): Margin space that is needed to get the page through the press.  Strictly speaking the *Grip is space that cannot be printed upon, and is always larger on one of the 4 edges of the paper. 

Grain – refer to paper grain

*= standard term not generally used at Gregath

June 2005, V4#6: Production Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

To test the grain of paper use one of the following:

  1. Moisten two right-angle edges of a sheet, and press between fingers.  As the sheet dries, the edge across the grain will be wavy, the edge with the grain will be straight.

  2. Tear the sheet in two directions.  It tears straighter and cleaner with the grain.

  3. Fold the sheet in two directions.  It folds easier and smoother with the grain.

End-use need, design considerations, print quality and budgetary needs should go into deciding what paper to use.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/archival.html

May 2005, V4#5: Production Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Paper Grain Direction:  All papers have a grain direction.  When the grain runs along the longest dimension of the sheet, the paper is “long grain”.  Grain is seldom a factor in offset printing, however it is a major consideration in binding.  Binderies prefer long grain since paper offers the least resistance in the same direction as most fibers in a sheet.  Also, pages in books tend to lie flat better when they are made with, rather than against the grain.  For saddle stitched books, a stronger book is produced with long grain, due to the fold being across the grain, but it doesn’t lay as flat.  Short grain paper is has difficulty maintaining dimensional stability and may result in more book problems such as wrinkled pages, etc.

May 2005, V4#5: Define Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Paper Grain: The direction fibers within paper generally lie, corresponding to the direction of their flow on the papermaking machine.