July 2015 Magazine – Genealogy Thursday, Jul 2 2015 

Do you make use of Google Scholar? Try out the database it was inspired by: http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/index;jsessionid=7B3491E8104BB7B80C9236B19C23FCEB

December 2011 E-Zine (V10#12): Define Wednesday, Nov 30 2011 

Writer’s Lingo:
Crop marks: lines indicating what part of the photograph to print. These are commonly placed directly on the face of the photograph with grease pencil (which will easily rub off later). Our company charges extra if many photos are submitted this way.
*Dead copy: Any previous drafts or copies that have been discarded once proof read and any changes have been completed. All drafts should be dated (easiest), marked or coded so the writer can be sure of working on the “current” and be able to see their progress in the older ones.
Terms marked with an asterisk (*) are not generally used in our office.
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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at http://www.gregathcompany.com/gloss.html and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/glosswrite.html

March 2004, V3#3: Define Tuesday, Jan 27 2009 

Paste up (pre-press): A (usually physical) composite of more than one original item/artifact.  Our offices use a repositionable adhesive to place items onto an original in preparation for printing. Warning: Many print processes don’t reproduce well when “clear” cellophane (“scotch” tape) is used.

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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at http://gregathcompany.com/gloss.html and
http://gregathcompany.com/glosswrite.html

February 2004, V3#2: Define Monday, Jan 26 2009 

Offset Printing: A photo-duplicate of each page – achieved through the use of a plate made from an the original.
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For other printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossary at http://www.gregathcompany.com/gloss.html

August 2003, V2#8: Design Sunday, Jan 11 2009 

We receive manuscripts, including pictures with the instructions “Do Not Cut Pictures”, every day. No printer that we know of would have any reason to cut your ORIGINAL pictures/submissions. In our printing process, a negative and a new print [known as a half-tone) must be made in order to be reproduced on an offset press. Many snapshots are of one or a few family members, with a whole lot of unnecessary background. Most of these pictures show very little, if any, detail of the subject. If they were enlarged and the half tone “cropped for effect”, the same size picture would show the subject(s) in much more detail.

July 2003, V2#7: Design Sunday, Jan 11 2009 

Pictures can and do add considerably to a book. Often an author may fail to secure photo information, thinking that the use of pictures would be too expensive. While it is true that the inclusion of photos does increase costs, their use can be cost effective, while adding a very nice touch to your valuable work. Check with your printer/publisher to see what type of format they can work with for your book and if any formats you may use carry additional expense.  We work from loose original [no negatives, please] black and white photos, sepias, tin types, color photos.  While not recommended, we also can work from b/w or color copies, some computer files or color slides.

Please note that while we can work from computer print outs, they shouldn’t be grouped on single printed out sheets. For economy’s sake, cut them apart so they are “loose” (don’t forget to ID them). If what we work from are not loose, additional charges will apply.