February 2016 E-Zine: Complete Monday, Feb 1 2016 

Design Inspiration
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At the earliest, as you complete your manuscript, you should begin thinking about what editions you will be publishing in. Estimated page count, target usage, and type of binding may dictate different maximum page margins for traditionally printed books. Depending on the software options (index, end/foot note, etc.) you use to produce your work separate manuscript files for each edition may be needed. Preliminary work for electronic edition may be done in a word processing application followed by a straight conversion (such as PDF) or export for more work done in a program geared to produce electronic publication manuscripts.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design/layout.html
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Book Manufacturing Concepts
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Using Microsoft Publisher, Adobe InDesign (or other program of this type)? While it is easy to place frames and objects outside of your established margins and even running off the edge of the page (full bleed), remember margins are necessary to produce a page pleasing to the eye and many forms of standard printing do not allow for no margin or bleed printing. Always place all elements, unless previously discussed with your publisher, within your established margins.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/info/tips/selfmanuscript.html
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Marketing advice
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In the 21st century Social Networking is not going away. Where you may have “pressed the flesh” and been active in organizations to network in the past (thus getting the word out on your current and past projects), getting involved in the online community can be great if your marketing is “grass roots” based. Don’t go crazy – it will just result in more stress about learning something new: Learn about your options, join one at a time and monitor a bit before making it a marketing platform. In this way, if the interface or tone doesn’t seem right for you, you won’t gain followers you’ll abandon if you discontinue.

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Genealogy ideas – this issue marketing applies to genealogy as well.
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Have a tip? e-mail us
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Computer aid!?! – see Design Inspiration this issue.

February, 2015 Magazine – Computers Monday, Feb 2 2015 

Rare is the photograph you’ll only use once in your manuscript. Often times, it may also be used online, through social networking, sharing with family, and promotional materials of many types. If you’ve not digitized a photo yet, we suggest a couple of options:
Keep masters of the highest resolution you have captured or can make – until replacing with updates or improvements. Reduce quality and size for each use from master.
Evaluate all uses you feel you will need and capture or produce graphics of a size that will satisfy them all.
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This section is drawn from http://www.gregathcompany.com/service/markting/website.html

February, 2015 Magazine – Marketing Monday, Feb 2 2015 

Now that we are all settling in to 2015, it’s time to revisit your marketing plan. If you don’t have one, now is a great time to make it a resolution and stick to it. While there are some books that contain such vital information that buyers will do anything to find you, marketing needs organized, planned, and followed through with.
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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/service/marketing

December 2011 E-Zine (V10#12): Design Wednesday, Nov 30 2011 

When considering a page number strategy, the following considerations may also influence your choice:
Does your subject have specialized page number format(s)
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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design/pagenumbers.html

December 2006, V5 #12: Computer Friday, Mar 20 2009 

99.9% of the books we produce are from Microsoft Word. However, it will depend on what the focus of your book is, as well as what software you are familiar with, and how much work you want the software to do for you. For instance, if the book is to contain many charts, a program that is geared toward generating these charts would be important. If you are working toward mainly fact oriented and are hoping the program will organize a manuscript, a program such as Family Tree Maker might be best. If you are looking for word processing and are familiar with the Corel family of products, you may not want to learn Microsoft Office. If you are wanting to go with fancy margins, clip art, photos, charts, tables, graphic elements on each page, etc., Microsoft Publisher may be the way to go. The bottom line, like so many other decisions comes down to you. It’s hard to beat making a wish list (I want the program to be able to…) and then looking for a product that fits best. Other factors, besides current software knowledge may be cost for new software, compatibility (if looking toward a hybrid or e-book).

Overall software we utilize most (remember, this doesn’t mean they are the best for you):

Manuscript: Microsoft Word (other Office programs such as Excel, Access, Publisher, and FrontPage can be helpful or used with Word, depending on project.)

Photographs: Adobe Photoshop

“Genealogy” Program (Charts, etc.): Family Tree Maker

May 2004, V3#5: Design Tuesday, Jan 27 2009 

Does your genealogy (book) contain quite a few pages?  Rather than publishing one book with 1,000 or more pages, consider breaking your work up into family lines for different books or volumes.  By doing this, they can be printed and released at different times or all at once.  This may ease the enormity of your “job” getting your family/families in print.

January 2004, V3#1: Genealogy Sunday, Jan 4 2009 

Stumped?  Are your organized?  It may sound silly, but unless you organize all your notes into something that anyone could walk in and look something up in, you may have numerous clues to your missing data already.  Organize your family data, proof, lists of where searched, correspondence – everything.  The computer is great because you may choose to even cross reference easily :o)

December 2006, V5#12: Computer Saturday, Dec 27 2008 

99.9% of the books we produce are from Microsoft Word. However, it will depend on what the focus of your book is, as well as what software you are familiar with, and how much work you want the software to do for you. For instance, if the book is to contain many charts, a program that is geared toward generating these charts would be important. If you are working toward mainly fact oriented and are hoping the program will organize a manuscript, a program such as Family Tree Maker might be best. If you are looking for word processing and are familiar with the Corel family of products, you may not want to learn Microsoft Office. If you are wanting to go with fancy margins, clip art, photos, charts, tables, graphic elements on each page, etc., Microsoft Publisher may be the way to go. The bottom line, like so many other decisions comes down to you. It’s hard to beat making a wish list (I want the program to be able to…) and then looking for a product that fits best. Other factors, besides current software knowledge may be cost for new software, compatibility (if looking toward a hybrid or e-book).

Overall software we utilize most (remember, this doesn’t mean they are the best for you):

Manuscript: Microsoft Word (other Office programs such as Excel, Access, Publisher, and FrontPage can be helpful or used with Word, depending on project.)

Photographs: Adobe Photoshop

“Genealogy” Program (Charts, etc.): Family Tree Maker

February 2006, V5#2: Computer Friday, Dec 26 2008 

Organization – part 4

Do you have a lot of photos that have been given to you, you’ve taken, or scanned?  If so, they could be slowing your computer down.  Additionally, if the only copy of a photo you have is on your hard drive, we really don’t want to think what will happen if the computer crashes.  If you have the budget and don’t mind new hardware, there are several excellent back up systems you can purchase and install to take care of knowing your photos are safe.  But what about those of us with less than 40% hard drive space open?  It’s time to file your photos!  One of the easiest ways with today’s technology is with a USB drive (starting at $20).  Once you have tamed the photos and put them into file folders, simply plug the drive into your computer, open up its’ window and a window that shows your photos and drag and drop.  It is suggested that you keep the drive with a general table of contents to make retreval/enjoyment fairly easy.  Another excellent way to file photos is by CD. Once you have your photos on removable storage media (drives or disks), it is up to you whether to keep them on your computer.

While you can use this filing tactic with any type of files, currently photos are the universal memory hog.  If you do digital video; have your genealogy back to the 1600 (including lots of collateral lines) in GEDCOM, etc.; have all your audio collection in the hard drive; etc. all of these may be filed similar to the photo example above.

Old School Tip: Were you computing at home in the 1980s?  Still have those large floppy boxes?  If so, they make excellent CD storage – with or without the jewel cases!

Please Note: Due to the newness of digital storage, it is important to keep your storage up to date.  Some of us still have large floppy disks with data on them – and no where to use them!

January 2006, V5#1: Computer Friday, Dec 26 2008 

Organization – part 3

As you begin wholesale organization, you may find more than one copy of a file that is similar, if not apparently an exact duplicate.  There is no reason (other than personal preference and convenience) to have more than one file with the same information in it on your hard drive.  Back up copies may be made on any number of types of removable media (CDs, flash drives, memory cards or sticks, etc.) or even a dedicated back up hard drive.

So, how do you select what to keep and what to pitch without extensive proofing to be sure you don’t delete the best one?  Here are a few suggestions:

In Windows Explorer (or even just an “open” window), find the “Views” button near the top, just under the title bar.  This button will look similar to an index card with dots and/or dashes on it and may have a down arrow to the right of it.  Clicking the main button will “scroll” through the types of views the computer allows you to see for the contents of the file.  If a down arrow is showing, clicking it will give you a list of the views.  For this, select the “details” – it will show file name, save date, file size, etc. in columns.  Next, locate your apparently duplicate files – were they saved on the same date, are they the same size, etc.  Use this information to help you decide which may be the best to keep and what is outdated.

Still not sure what to keep?  Choose one to keep on the hard drive and make a backup media copy of all other versions – in case they are ever needed.

More next month…

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