February 2016 E-Zine: Complete Monday, Feb 1 2016 

Design Inspiration
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At the earliest, as you complete your manuscript, you should begin thinking about what editions you will be publishing in. Estimated page count, target usage, and type of binding may dictate different maximum page margins for traditionally printed books. Depending on the software options (index, end/foot note, etc.) you use to produce your work separate manuscript files for each edition may be needed. Preliminary work for electronic edition may be done in a word processing application followed by a straight conversion (such as PDF) or export for more work done in a program geared to produce electronic publication manuscripts.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design/layout.html
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Book Manufacturing Concepts
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Using Microsoft Publisher, Adobe InDesign (or other program of this type)? While it is easy to place frames and objects outside of your established margins and even running off the edge of the page (full bleed), remember margins are necessary to produce a page pleasing to the eye and many forms of standard printing do not allow for no margin or bleed printing. Always place all elements, unless previously discussed with your publisher, within your established margins.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/info/tips/selfmanuscript.html
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Marketing advice
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In the 21st century Social Networking is not going away. Where you may have “pressed the flesh” and been active in organizations to network in the past (thus getting the word out on your current and past projects), getting involved in the online community can be great if your marketing is “grass roots” based. Don’t go crazy – it will just result in more stress about learning something new: Learn about your options, join one at a time and monitor a bit before making it a marketing platform. In this way, if the interface or tone doesn’t seem right for you, you won’t gain followers you’ll abandon if you discontinue.

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Genealogy ideas – this issue marketing applies to genealogy as well.
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Computer aid!?! – see Design Inspiration this issue.

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Electronic Magazine – November 2014 v13#11: Marketing Monday, Nov 3 2014 

As family historians, most authors have a list of public (or private) repositories that they would like to see their work preserved in. Many times this list equals or dwarfs the list of “paying customers”. Many times budget will impact how many courtesy copies may even be produced: Consider soliciting sponsored copies. With POD, there is no reason a special “donated by” page can not be included directly into the book binding. A more traditional route would be with personalized donation book plates. Further incentives, beyond the good preservation work, might include a gift, digital copies of source material, special access to your archives, etc.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/service/marketing

October 2006, V5 #10: Genealogy Friday, Mar 20 2009 

Part of a genealogy or history related service or social organization? Consider having an ancestor round table. Everyone bring their knowledge and an ancestor. In turn, each give a brief case study of the ancestor and ask for suggestions of your fellows. If you have enough members interested, it could even be open to the public as a membership event, or fund raiser.

June 2007, V6#6: Genealogy Wednesday, Jan 7 2009 

No one is an island – get involved. One of the easiest ways to grow and learn as a researcher is to get out there and interact with other researchers. Book learning not your thing? The more friends you have, the more information they can give you in an informal setting. Try genealogy, history, lineal, and other service organizations!

April 2005, V4#4: Genealogy Sunday, Jan 4 2009 

Sometimes there is no substitute for the effort you could put in researching off the computer and outside of your home.  Sometimes this takes the form of traipsing to cemeteries and court houses.  Other times it means taking a trip (sometimes consisting of several days) to a targeted or major research repository. 

When a repository trip is called for, consider traveling with other researchers.  Most groups take travel time as “sounding board” time.  It’s also nice to know someone else already when you enter a repository – even if it everyone’s first trip.  General research trips are offered through lots of places, from a school, library, organization, researcher travel agent, to us: http://www.gregathcompany.com/tours!

When a cemetery/court house trip is needed, go ahead and ask for research travel companions (make an announcement at all your research related organizational meetings, poll you email address book, etc.), you never know who may want to go – for their own research, or just to “get away” for a bit.

September 2004, V3#9: Genealogy Sunday, Jan 4 2009 

Many people when researching forget to use reference materials in concert.  While this sounds strange, sometimes it doesn’t even cross their minds.  Example: Found the ancestor in the census but that year doesn’t have everything you want (or you prefer more than one documented source) – look in other state, county, and local records as well as local newspapers.  Could they have belonged to a local church or (fraternal) organization?  Don’t leave these out of the search!

March 2004, V3#3: Genealogy Sunday, Jan 4 2009 

Look to local organizations, senior/ethnic/church centers, colleges, libraries, trade schools, etc. to see what type (if any) genealogy instruction/teachers they have and/or offer.  You may be surprised at the active genealogy community you find.

January 2003, V2#1: Genealogy Saturday, Jan 3 2009 

If your lost ancestor is missing during a particular time period, find out if there are any lineal organizations for that time period such as Daughters/Sons/Children of the American Revolution (3 different organizations).  Contact a local chapter to see if they are able to help with your problem.

February 2006, V5#2: Computer Friday, Dec 26 2008 

Organization – part 4

Do you have a lot of photos that have been given to you, you’ve taken, or scanned?  If so, they could be slowing your computer down.  Additionally, if the only copy of a photo you have is on your hard drive, we really don’t want to think what will happen if the computer crashes.  If you have the budget and don’t mind new hardware, there are several excellent back up systems you can purchase and install to take care of knowing your photos are safe.  But what about those of us with less than 40% hard drive space open?  It’s time to file your photos!  One of the easiest ways with today’s technology is with a USB drive (starting at $20).  Once you have tamed the photos and put them into file folders, simply plug the drive into your computer, open up its’ window and a window that shows your photos and drag and drop.  It is suggested that you keep the drive with a general table of contents to make retreval/enjoyment fairly easy.  Another excellent way to file photos is by CD. Once you have your photos on removable storage media (drives or disks), it is up to you whether to keep them on your computer.

While you can use this filing tactic with any type of files, currently photos are the universal memory hog.  If you do digital video; have your genealogy back to the 1600 (including lots of collateral lines) in GEDCOM, etc.; have all your audio collection in the hard drive; etc. all of these may be filed similar to the photo example above.

Old School Tip: Were you computing at home in the 1980s?  Still have those large floppy boxes?  If so, they make excellent CD storage – with or without the jewel cases!

Please Note: Due to the newness of digital storage, it is important to keep your storage up to date.  Some of us still have large floppy disks with data on them – and no where to use them!

January 2006, V5#1: Computer Friday, Dec 26 2008 

Organization – part 3

As you begin wholesale organization, you may find more than one copy of a file that is similar, if not apparently an exact duplicate.  There is no reason (other than personal preference and convenience) to have more than one file with the same information in it on your hard drive.  Back up copies may be made on any number of types of removable media (CDs, flash drives, memory cards or sticks, etc.) or even a dedicated back up hard drive.

So, how do you select what to keep and what to pitch without extensive proofing to be sure you don’t delete the best one?  Here are a few suggestions:

In Windows Explorer (or even just an “open” window), find the “Views” button near the top, just under the title bar.  This button will look similar to an index card with dots and/or dashes on it and may have a down arrow to the right of it.  Clicking the main button will “scroll” through the types of views the computer allows you to see for the contents of the file.  If a down arrow is showing, clicking it will give you a list of the views.  For this, select the “details” – it will show file name, save date, file size, etc. in columns.  Next, locate your apparently duplicate files – were they saved on the same date, are they the same size, etc.  Use this information to help you decide which may be the best to keep and what is outdated.

Still not sure what to keep?  Choose one to keep on the hard drive and make a backup media copy of all other versions – in case they are ever needed.

More next month…

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