March, 2014 Electronic Magazine – Computer Tuesday, May 20 2014 

Are you someone who is finally getting comfortable with Microsoft Word? Do you not have access to Publisher, or not ready to learn its interface, but want some of the templates? Word isn’t as easy to use to produce finished pieces, however, more templates are available to download from http://www.office.com – more FAX sheets, invoices, newsletters, calendars, etc.

December 2006, V5 #12: Computer Friday, Mar 20 2009 

99.9% of the books we produce are from Microsoft Word. However, it will depend on what the focus of your book is, as well as what software you are familiar with, and how much work you want the software to do for you. For instance, if the book is to contain many charts, a program that is geared toward generating these charts would be important. If you are working toward mainly fact oriented and are hoping the program will organize a manuscript, a program such as Family Tree Maker might be best. If you are looking for word processing and are familiar with the Corel family of products, you may not want to learn Microsoft Office. If you are wanting to go with fancy margins, clip art, photos, charts, tables, graphic elements on each page, etc., Microsoft Publisher may be the way to go. The bottom line, like so many other decisions comes down to you. It’s hard to beat making a wish list (I want the program to be able to…) and then looking for a product that fits best. Other factors, besides current software knowledge may be cost for new software, compatibility (if looking toward a hybrid or e-book).

Overall software we utilize most (remember, this doesn’t mean they are the best for you):

Manuscript: Microsoft Word (other Office programs such as Excel, Access, Publisher, and FrontPage can be helpful or used with Word, depending on project.)

Photographs: Adobe Photoshop

“Genealogy” Program (Charts, etc.): Family Tree Maker

January 2007, V6#1: Computer Tuesday, Dec 30 2008 

What software to use? (part 2)

If you are looking for a “desktop typewriter”, almost any word processing software will do. If you have a Microsoft Window based system, you have WordPad. This is a very basic program, but if you aren’t interested in any bells and whistles (such as spell check, etc.), it is fairly easy to learn and operate. If you don’t have a MS Windows based system, or want to look at something else, there are many shareware programs available at little or no cost.

December 2006, V5#12: Computer Saturday, Dec 27 2008 

99.9% of the books we produce are from Microsoft Word. However, it will depend on what the focus of your book is, as well as what software you are familiar with, and how much work you want the software to do for you. For instance, if the book is to contain many charts, a program that is geared toward generating these charts would be important. If you are working toward mainly fact oriented and are hoping the program will organize a manuscript, a program such as Family Tree Maker might be best. If you are looking for word processing and are familiar with the Corel family of products, you may not want to learn Microsoft Office. If you are wanting to go with fancy margins, clip art, photos, charts, tables, graphic elements on each page, etc., Microsoft Publisher may be the way to go. The bottom line, like so many other decisions comes down to you. It’s hard to beat making a wish list (I want the program to be able to…) and then looking for a product that fits best. Other factors, besides current software knowledge may be cost for new software, compatibility (if looking toward a hybrid or e-book).

Overall software we utilize most (remember, this doesn’t mean they are the best for you):

Manuscript: Microsoft Word (other Office programs such as Excel, Access, Publisher, and FrontPage can be helpful or used with Word, depending on project.)

Photographs: Adobe Photoshop

“Genealogy” Program (Charts, etc.): Family Tree Maker

August 2006, V5#8: Computer Saturday, Dec 27 2008 

Does it seem like every document or web page you open has smaller text then the last? If your mouse of choice has a wheel (“wheel mouse”), you may be in luck. In at least Microsoft Word and Internet Explorer, this trick works like a dream (most of the time): When you want to see the text larger on a page or document you are viewing, be sure your mouse pointer is somewhere on the “page” in question, hold down your control key and move your wheel away from you (while holding the mouse still). This should zoom the text in direct relation to how far you move the wheel. The reverse is true if moving the wheel toward you. Try this in your favorite program – it might work there too!

May 2006, V5#5: Computer Friday, Dec 26 2008 

MS Word Templates

Do you have a file that you use over and over again – such as letterhead layout or basic query? If so, an easy way not to have to retype it all each time is to save a generic file. If there is changing information in the text, replace it with a line of symbols you eye is drawn to (*************). When you want to use the saved file, open it and automatically save as with the new file name, then compose. If you want to, a real template can be made, but they are opened differently then regular files. Get  the file ready, then when you save as, change the program type from “word document” to “document template” – save as usual but where the computer wants you to. Then, to use the template, from the pull down menus choose file, then new. This will bring up the right hand pane or a window. If the template you want isn’t shown in the right hand pane, choose general templates which will bring up the window – choose the template you wish to use and it will open as a new document.

(For reversal of mouse see June)