March, 2014 Electronic Magazine – Marketing Tuesday, May 20 2014 

To look over an 8 week case study an no-nonsense check list of how to assist any event host in boosting marketing, foot traffic, and interest, read the article, How to Fill a Room by Ellen Cassedy (reprinted with permission). This is a great blueprint for every stop on a marketing tour or junket. However, for multiple local events, it would have to be adjusted, so as not to make friends and local contacts begin to tune you out.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/service/marketing/events.html

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January 2007, V6#1: Genealogy Wednesday, Jan 7 2009 

Check with your local library, even if they don’t have a large genealogy section, to see what online services they offer. They can assist you with using WorldCat (http://www.worldcat.org) to see where the closest copy of particular books are available in public collections.

July 2005, V4#7: Genealogy Monday, Jan 5 2009 

Don’t overlook your local and regional genealogy events, retreats, genealogy, ancestor or book fairs!  While networking and finding hot leads are traditionally considered when attending ancestor fairs, you never know when you’ll meet someone researching one or more of your lines at any genealogy or family event.  When preparing to go consider having a name badge or ribbon (or even a shirt) made that details at least your main research lines.  Some events provide bulletin boards, chat areas, etc. – but it never hurts to increase your chances to “go above and beyond” planned activities to search out other researchers on your line.

September 2004, V3#9: Genealogy Sunday, Jan 4 2009 

Many people when researching forget to use reference materials in concert.  While this sounds strange, sometimes it doesn’t even cross their minds.  Example: Found the ancestor in the census but that year doesn’t have everything you want (or you prefer more than one documented source) – look in other state, county, and local records as well as local newspapers.  Could they have belonged to a local church or (fraternal) organization?  Don’t leave these out of the search!

July 2004, V3#7: Genealogy Sunday, Jan 4 2009 

Can’t see yourself subscribing to a lot of online pay services such as Ancestry?  Check you local libraries and genealogical collections that are “online”.  Many strong collections already subscribe to some extent for their patrons.

March 2004, V3#3: Genealogy Sunday, Jan 4 2009 

Look to local organizations, senior/ethnic/church centers, colleges, libraries, trade schools, etc. to see what type (if any) genealogy instruction/teachers they have and/or offer.  You may be surprised at the active genealogy community you find.

January 2003, V2#1: Genealogy Saturday, Jan 3 2009 

If your lost ancestor is missing during a particular time period, find out if there are any lineal organizations for that time period such as Daughters/Sons/Children of the American Revolution (3 different organizations).  Contact a local chapter to see if they are able to help with your problem.

September 2002, V1#1: Marketing Wednesday, Dec 24 2008 

Locally, if no one has thrown you an autograph or release party, you can do one yourself.  Make sure you notify all the local media as well as book stores, libraries, etc. in addition to sending out personal invitations.