September 2006, V5 #9: Design Friday, Mar 20 2009 

Specific suggestions while deciding index entry/item framework:

  • Maiden/Married Names can be a handful. However, when the information is available, it is important to list the female under both in an index. For Jane Harrison Smith, you should find a listing of some type for Jane under both Harrison and Smith. This can be accomplished by a double entry, blind entry, or a see also entry.

 

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/indexing.html

March 2009, V8#3: Design Monday, Mar 2 2009 

There is no “silver bullet” for proper publication design or format. However, there are some very basic rules to get you ready to go:

Basic design elements to consider

  • header

  • footer

  • page numbers

  • font style(s)

  • font size(s)

  • chapter/section treatments

  • general page layout

  • foot/end note treatment

  • index treatment and layout

  • title

  • reverse of title (verso)

  • binding

  • Electronic?

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This section is drawn from www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design

June 2005, V4#6: Design Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Sometimes, the choice of index format is governed by economics of a printed book.  We suggest that an index format is used that the author would like to see in a reference book.  Regardless of one’s ultimate choice of index format, it is sometimes tempting to disregard – even a completed index – to save the cost of printing the extra pages.  With the strong growth of personal computers in the home, a suggestion is placing that 50 pages (not uncommon for a large book) of index on CD to include in all book sales.  Offer a print out upon request for a print out fee – this can be staple bound, 3-hole punched, etc.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/indexing.html

May 2003, V2#5: Design Sunday, Jan 11 2009 

An index adds two valuable things to any book. The index makes the book easier to use and adds to its marketability.  Almost everyone has their own idea what a complete index is.  We suggest at least a complete surname index for genealogical books.  Content and format is up to you!

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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/tips.html 

November 2008, V7#11: Genealogy Saturday, Jan 10 2009 

Have your tried www.clusty.com yet? It started life as vivisimo – it “pre-sorts” your results by topic. No more wading Miami, Florida results when looking for Miami, Oklahoma or Ohio!

August 2007, V6#8: Genealogy Wednesday, Jan 7 2009 

Have you checked out PERSI lately? It is available through HeritageQuest. While this is a subscription program, many libraries with strong genealogy programs allow access on site, and some do from your home. More about PERSI from the Allen County Public Library (http://www.acpl.lib.in.us/genealogy/persi.html):

“The Periodical Source Index, or PERSI, is the largest subject index to genealogical and historical periodical articles in the world. Created by the foundation and department staff of the Genealogy Center of the library here in Fort Wayne, Indiana, PERSI is widely recognized as being a vital source for genealogical researchers.

PERSI is a comprehensive subject index covering genealogy and local history periodicals written in English and French (Canada) since 1800. The time period of the articles ranges from the 1700s to the present. More than 1.8 million index entries from nearly ten thousand titles are represented by this work.

If you are in one of the fourteen Allen County Public Library facilities, you may search the PERSI resource by clicking on “E-Resources” on the main webpage <www.ACPL.Info> and scrolling down to “HeritageQuestOnline.” Clicking on that link and then choosing the “Search PERSI” option with open the index for you. If you do not live in Allen County, IN, check with your local library about the availability of HeritageQuestOnline in your area.”

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