Retreat 2016 New Speaker Tuesday, Mar 8 2016 

Joe Bott will be joining us at the retreat to discuss and enlighten us about many positive facets of his free web project Dead Fred. His online photo archive has harnessed the power of networking to put identifications to photographs for many years – since before crowd-sourcing was popular. Visit the Retreat online for more information.

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November 2003, V2#11: Design Saturday, Jan 17 2009 

Once you’ve decided to include photographs, check with your printer/publisher as to the procedure they want you to use.  This can be done before or after you choose the exact photos.  We request authors arrange pictures on each page for placement, and copy the page (to help make sure there are no mistakes later). Photos (or print outs) should remain unattached to the page (or to each other), with placement and page ID on reverse of the photo. Example: 3 photos on page 23 marked/IDed 23a, 23b, and 23c. Post-It notes are becoming popular for this type of identification. The manuscript page should have identical photo placement notations. All photos should be grouped and placed in the top of the manuscript box, before sending to the printer. If applicable, be sure to specify what is the most important subject when alterations are required. IF you are providing the half-tones, they should be trimmed and affixed to (or produced/saved as part of) the manuscript page, as a part of the camera ready manuscript,  to avoid additional expense.  

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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/tips.html

March 2008, V7#3: Genealogy Wednesday, Jan 7 2009 

Stamping Your Books
By Cari Thomas

I found Gene Ewert’s suggestions about things to do when taking a
genealogy trip of great value, and several “rookie mistakes” he
mentioned were ones I’ve encountered through my years. Thanks Gene.

Gene suggested that the greatest rookie mistake was to not write
identification and contact information in your notebooks so that they
could be returned if lost. I would like to pass along an additional
suggestion.

I say “pass along” because this tip comes compliments of my late
mother-in-law, Mary Lib Tipton Thomas, who was a junior high school
librarian in Ohio for many years.

Mary Lib’s practice was not only to write identifying information on
the insides of the front and back covers as Gene Ewert suggested, but
to include it in the middle of the book as well. She always put the
school logo stamp on page fifty of each book in her library or in the
middle of the book if it had less than fifty pages.

A book would still be identifiable (and therefore returnable) because
of that interior stamp, even if it had lost its cover or end pages.
This tip is especially valuable for irreplaceable genealogical
notebooks and records.

To read Gene Ewert’s article, “What I Learned from my Genealogy Trip,”
visit:
http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/review/2007/1031.txt

Previously published in RootsWeb Review: 7 November 2007, Vol. 10, No. 45

July 2005, V4#7: Genealogy Monday, Jan 5 2009 

Don’t overlook your local and regional genealogy events, retreats, genealogy, ancestor or book fairs!  While networking and finding hot leads are traditionally considered when attending ancestor fairs, you never know when you’ll meet someone researching one or more of your lines at any genealogy or family event.  When preparing to go consider having a name badge or ribbon (or even a shirt) made that details at least your main research lines.  Some events provide bulletin boards, chat areas, etc. – but it never hurts to increase your chances to “go above and beyond” planned activities to search out other researchers on your line.