August 2006, V5 #8: Genealogy Friday, Mar 20 2009 

FAMILY HEALTH HISTORY: Know your past; protect your future! 

This summer as you plan for family reunions, don’t forget to take time to talk about your family health history. Family reunions are the perfect time to learn about and share, not only your genealogy but your family health history as well. And for some families, knowing this information could be life-saving. This is because many health problems like heart disease, asthma, cancer, and diabetes tend to run in families. When close family members have the same health problem or develop a problem at a younger age than expected, this can increase other family members’ risk of developing the problem. But the good news is, by learning about your family health history, you can make healthy choices to lower your risk.
 To help families talk about and share their family health history, the Utah Department of Health developed a free Family Health History Toolkit. The toolkit contains a pedigree chart, fun ideas, and talking points you can use with family members to collect about your family health history. 
 
To get a free Family Health History Toolkit visit www.health.utah.gov/genomics or call the Health Resource Line at 1-888-222-2542.

From Federation of Genealogical Societies “FGS Delegate Digest”  Volume 13, No. 9, July 2006

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March 2009, V8#3: Genealogy Monday, Mar 2 2009 

Vancouver Public Library has produced a new resource of special interest to
genealogists with Chinese-Canadian roots.  The project also demonstrates
the use of wiki technology for genealogy-related purposes.

Chinese-Canadians: Profiles from a Community is a wiki-based project
developed in partnership with Library and Archives Canada.  The project
reflects the long history of the Chinese community in Canada.  The goal is
to create a portrait of the early Chinese-Canadian community by collecting
and sharing the stories of individuals of Chinese origin who were born in
Canada in the 19th century.

The core of the wiki is the transcription of a portion of a document
produced by the federal government in 1923, recording all individuals born
in Canada to parents of Chinese origin.   The transcribed portion
corresponds to 461 individuals born prior to 1901 and is linked to separate
profiles for each person.  Anyone can register for free and contribute to
the profiles, adding biographical details, photographs, document images and
other information.  Research tools are provided for those who would like to
help search for the stories of these early Chinese-Canadians in both online
and offline sources.

To view and participate in the wiki, go to http://ccgwiki.vpl.ca

From the Librarians Serving Genealogists E-List

March 2005, V4#3: Marketing Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Marketing is promotion!  To promote a book, good things about the book contents, yourself, your family (if genealogy) or area (if research tool), and history, as well at the physical form the book takes will be pointed out. These are all selling points.  Don’t overlook something that is positive because it wasn’t the main publishing focus.  For instance, archival quality is becoming a much talked about and sought after element in reference book publishing.  Whether this was of high priority for the author personally, it may contribute to sales if it is publicized.

June 2007, V6#6: Genealogy Wednesday, Jan 7 2009 

No one is an island – get involved. One of the easiest ways to grow and learn as a researcher is to get out there and interact with other researchers. Book learning not your thing? The more friends you have, the more information they can give you in an informal setting. Try genealogy, history, lineal, and other service organizations!

February 2007, V6#2: Genealogy Wednesday, Jan 7 2009 

The following was published in The Arkansas Genealogical Society E-zine, Volume 1, Number 4 (November 2006)

Contributed by Carolyn Earle Billingsley

Tips for Arkansas Researchers

Adding images to your family history should be part of every genealogist’s repertoire. Images like maps, pedigree charts, diagrams, and photos add interest and a personal touch to your research. But how many of you have thought about postcards?

Sometimes you don’t have an image of your grandfather visiting the courthouse, but you can still spice up your family history with a postcard image of that courthouse. In my case, for example, I don’t have a photo of my parents sitting on the steps of the high school where they graduated back in the 1940s, but I was able to find a postcard of the school that dated to that era.

You might be surprised how many post cards there are out there. E-bay is an excellent place for finding them.

And now Ancestry.com has a large collection of postcards online. Here’s their press release about this new collection:

Source Information: Ancestry.com. Historical Postcards Collection, c. 1893-1963 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, Inc., 2006. Original data: Mary Martin Postcards (www.MaryLMartin.com), Perryville, MD, USA.

About Historical Postcards Collection, c. 1893-1963:

This database contains approximately 50,000 postcards dating from about 1893-1963. About three-quarters of the postcards contain pictures from places within the United States, while the remaining fourth contains pictures from abroad. Information provided about each postcard includes:

Place information (city/town, county, state/province, country)
Caption
Postcard era (year range from which the postcard may be dated)

This database is primarily useful for obtaining a photograph or picture of a specific place in time. If you do not already have pictures of the places your ancestors lived, historical postcards are a good alternative to personal photos.

Ancestry’s collection even has an old postcard of the church my great-grandparents belonged to in Little Rock-and over 500 postcards of a variety of Arkansas sites. I especially liked the 1915 card of the old Confederate Soldiers Home, which has long since been torn down. The image includes the back side of the card, with the written message was written, along with the old stamp and the postmark.

So look around your relatives’ houses, poke around flea markets, search the Internet, peruse e-Bay, and check out Ancestry.com for images to fill in those gaps in your family’s pictorial history.

October 2006, V5#10: Genealogy Tuesday, Jan 6 2009 

Part of a genealogy or history related service or social organization? Consider having an ancestor round table. Everyone bring their knowledge and an ancestor. In turn, each give a brief case study of the ancestor and ask for suggestions of your fellows. If you have enough members interested, it could even be open to the public as a membership event, or fund raiser.

August 2006, V5#8: Genealogy Tuesday, Jan 6 2009 

FAMILY HEALTH HISTORY: Know your past; protect your future! 

This summer as you plan for family reunions, don’t forget to take time to talk about your family health history. Family reunions are the perfect time to learn about and share, not only your genealogy but your family health history as well. And for some families, knowing this information could be life-saving. This is because many health problems like heart disease, asthma, cancer, and diabetes tend to run in families. When close family members have the same health problem or develop a problem at a younger age than expected, this can increase other family members’ risk of developing the problem. But the good news is, by learning about your family health history, you can make healthy choices to lower your risk.
 To help families talk about and share their family health history, the Utah Department of Health developed a free Family Health History Toolkit. The toolkit contains a pedigree chart, fun ideas, and talking points you can use with family members to collect about your family health history. 
 
To get a free Family Health History Toolkit visit www.health.utah.gov/genomics or call the Health Resource Line at 1-888-222-2542.

From Federation of Genealogical Societies “FGS Delegate Digest”  Volume 13, No. 9, July 2006

July 2003, V2#7: Genealogy Saturday, Jan 3 2009 

While becoming that student of history we have already suggested, is your lost ancestor in America during the time the US was giving out free land to it’s citizens?  If so, your next stop should be the homestead records!  This little utilized collection of documents and information is housed at the national archives and has not been reproduced or indexed in any wide reaching way.  The Homestead National Monument has begun exploring the best way to augment NARA general paper preservation process by replicating them in Nebraska.

May 2003, V2#5: Genealogy Saturday, Jan 3 2009 

If you have a family story stating you are related to a certain person (Daniel Boon, Thomas Jefferson, King Henry VIII, etc.). but have not been able to get your research back in time past a certain ancestor, don’t fall into the “missing link” trap.  Many genealogists, especially those who have taken up research without any training or guidance will simply skip this lost ancestor and pick up research with who they “are sure” is this ancestor’s parents.  People have done untold research on other people’s families in this manner – not their own.  While it is tempting to try and “reverse engineer” the pedigree in this manner, it rarely works.

March 2003, V2#3: Genealogy Saturday, Jan 3 2009 

Though it is real easy, don’t fall into a “parent trap”.  While getting oral history including stories, dates, relations is an invaluable tool for the beginning genealogist (indeed, a great book starting activity), always take the time to obtain records for all information gained in this manner.  This record search can be something you do with the relative providing the information or independently.

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