October 2009, V8#10: Define Tuesday, Sep 29 2009 

Hardbinding Spotlight #3

Corners – Library: Each corner of the cover material is folded at a 45-degree angle that permanently affixes to the cover boards. All glued-off overhang shall be turned into the case. Meets library binding standard: ANSI/NISO/LIB Z39.78

Corners – Traditional: Overhang shall be cut away  at a 45-degree angle at each corner. All head and tale overhang shall be turned into the case, then the tip of the corner tucked in before the fore and back edges are permanently adhered. Meets library binding standard: ANSI/NISO/LIB Z39.78

Deluxe Hard CoverCover: The outer part of any book. Covers are generally labeled as hard or soft. Type of cover effects types of bindings possible.

End Sheet(s) (*Leaf/*end papers): The element of a hardbound book that consists of the “inside” of the covers and the first and last sheet of paper in the book.  The end sheets are adhered to the inside of the binding boards and attach to the book via a double hinge that includes a sheet of paper.

*Head: The top, specifically the edge, of the book.

Headband: A strip of embroidered cloth at the end of the spine, exending beyond the book block. Optional ALA element included in Gregath deluxe binding.

Hinge In: A paper or cloth strip may be adhered along the binding edge of the a page, or pages, to be added after the book has been bound, so that the strip extends beyond the binding edge. This can then be “hinged” into a “finished” book by pasting up the part of the paper or cloth strip that extends beyond the addition, and adhering the strip to the binding edge of a sheet (or leaf) in the text block.  This may also be used to change a given published page: cut the page to be replaced out of the existing book leaving as wide a bound paper strip as the binding margin will allow; follow instructions as above or – trim the replacement page to fit the published book (with extra paper to overlap bound strip); using an archival quality media, attach replacement page to bound strip.

* denotes a term that Gregath Publishing doesn’t normally use.

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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at http://www.gregathcompany.com/gloss.html and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/glosswrite.html

Run across a word that you don’t understand?  Try us – email us your word, term or phrase and we will see if we can shed some light on the matter!

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July 2009: V8#7: Production Friday, Jul 3 2009 

Not all hard bindings are created equal. Know the standard options of the publisher:

Standard ALA Oversewn Hard Binding: High Quality, Low Price
Deluxe Hard Binding Information
Full Color Covers
Specialty Hard Binding: High Quality, Low Price

If the standard offerings don’ already do so, can they include elements that you are interested in? This should be a factor in choosing your publisher/binder.

April 2009, V8#4: Design Monday, Apr 6 2009 

There is no “silver bullet” for proper publication design or format. However, there are some very basic rules to get you ready to go:

Some basic ideas to make your publication special (some ideas for Hardbound {HB} or Sofbound {SB} only)

  • Use colored paper (to match cover) as section dividers.

  • Use clipart or stock photography to liven up pages where you don’t have personal items.

  • Do add other things besides text.

  • Place information you might otherwise place on the endpapers (HB) or inside of cover (SB) as the frontice piece and the last printed page in the book for economy.

  • Add a CD or DVD of extra material – even color photos for printed b/w in book.

  • HB: Match your end papers to the cover (main) color.

  • HB: Use custom printed end sheets (end papers).

  • HB: If offered, use stock pre-printed end papers such as marbleized, etc.

  • HB: Consider dust jackets versus color covers.

  • SB: Print on the inside of the cover.

  • Post Publication: Hand number (or stamp) each book.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design

December 2005, V4#12: Design Thursday, Jan 29 2009 

If a hardbound book is produced, custom consider printed end sheets.  Lower cost alternative:

  • Fancy and/or author signed (possibly even numbered) book plate

September 2005, V4#9: Design Thursday, Jan 29 2009 

Splitting binding types for economy: Final book publishing costs can be reduced by the types of bindings that are chosen.  While a full project of hardbound books (standard, deluxe, or color) may not be affordable, a publishing of softbound books are.  Depending on the project, it may be possible to hard bind a few of these special to accommodate special paid pre-orders, special gift and family books, collector editions, etc.  By printing the text blocks at the same time, offset orders even saves on printing, versus publishing a hand full of hardbound books separately.

May 2005, V4#5: Design Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Too many choices to decide?  Consider choosing a color (scheme) that matches a favorite color, allow the publisher to select something, or take the color (scheme) from family crest or tartan.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/bindings.html

November 2004, V3#11: Production Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

If a CD is to be included with your book, work with your publisher for the best way to do so.  If producing a soft bound book, a special envelope page bound in the spine might be best for holding a CD.  With a large hardbound book one might choose to glue a CD sleeve onto the end sheet, or a spindle core – if neither are available as part of the end sheet.  Of course, a CD can also be included in a book purchase without attaching it to the book – it’s own sleeve/jewel case, etc. sent along with the cover letter for mail order and explained at point of purchase.

November 2004, V3#11: Design Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

ISBN stands for International Standard Book Number and is usually associated with the barcode on the back of books.  This number is assigned to a publication from the “publisher’s” prefix group – ultimately from R. R. Bowker – http://www.bowker.com.  A number only applies to the publication from that publisher in that format only.  In other words, if you have an ISBN on a hardbound book, your softbound edition can’t use the same number.  Some printers have numbers that can either be used for free, or for a small fee for publications.  Additionally, regardless of who produces the book, you can purchase your own block of numbers.  This may help if you don’t plan to stay with the same production company.  If you use printer A’s ISBN for the first edition and for your second printing use printer B – you can not use printer A’s ISBN on the second edition.  For more information, check out Bowker’s site above.  An ISBN barcode may be required if you wish your book to be carried in some bookstores.

June 2004, V3#6: Production Tuesday, Jan 27 2009 

In an effort to increase our economical services, for a limited time, what used to be our standard buckram hardbound price for books of 100+quantity has now become “standard” and the books will be rounded as well as carry spine bars at no additional cost.

November 2003, V2#11: Define Saturday, Jan 17 2009 

Hardbound (hard back, hard cover): Books that are have a binding material covered “board” affixed to the glued and/or sewn book block.  Several different methods can be used. 

We employ – Library Oversewn (see http://www.gregathcompany.com/lohb/index.html and covered with the binding material of your choice, over .98 binding boards.

Standard Buckram Hardbinding: see above – binding material is buckram with a free spine imprint and free single line front cover imprint – usually gold foil.

Deluxe/Executive Hardbinding: see above – binding material is usually Lexitone with free spine imprint including bars and free custom (no larger than 6×9″) front imprint – variety of inks & foils available.
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For other printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossary at http://www.gregathcompany.com/gloss.html

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