February, 2015 Magazine – Design Monday, Feb 2 2015 

How many authors design a spectacular color cover – on the front and spine only? Traditionally, genealogy and history books didn’t have anything on the back cover. Economically, with color covers, there is almost no advantage to this. Even though one shouldn’t over clutter a cover layout, consider turning the back cover into a collage!
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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/binding/art/collage.html

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August 2009, V8#8: Computers Wednesday, Aug 5 2009 

With group (publishing), unless you can get together at “the drop of a hat”, your group may find itself in need of a way to share files over the internet. The easiest way to do that is pick a format you all use and send email attachments. However, many people prefer to add another layer of anti-virus protection to this. Rather than basically computer to computer (email), computer to third party area where it can be scanned before downloading into computer. Basic needs can be fulfilled by having an electronic group online, like through Yahoo or Google. However, if more space is needed, here are a few suggestions:

  • www.box.net – free or paid services

  • www.drop.io – this is great because you can set the files to expire when they are loaded. When they expire, they are deleted from the internet.

  • Microsoft SharePoint – Robust paid service

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/groups.htm

April 2006, V5#4: Define Thursday, Jan 29 2009 

Text Block: The pages/leaves of a book after they have been bound together. A group of printed or written pages that may be or have been bound, excluding all paper to be added by the bookbinder such as the endpapers, etc.

Book Block: Endpapers, text block and all other materials before hard or soft binding.

June 2004, V3#6: Design Tuesday, Jan 27 2009 

When putting out more than one family (line) book, this can be done as totally separate books with different design choices.  They can also be put out as volumes in the set of your family.  These would utilize the same design choices and be numbered.  Volumes can also be sold as sets or individual volumes easier than a group of family books that are not a “set”.

November 2003, V2#11: Design Saturday, Jan 17 2009 

Once you’ve decided to include photographs, check with your printer/publisher as to the procedure they want you to use.  This can be done before or after you choose the exact photos.  We request authors arrange pictures on each page for placement, and copy the page (to help make sure there are no mistakes later). Photos (or print outs) should remain unattached to the page (or to each other), with placement and page ID on reverse of the photo. Example: 3 photos on page 23 marked/IDed 23a, 23b, and 23c. Post-It notes are becoming popular for this type of identification. The manuscript page should have identical photo placement notations. All photos should be grouped and placed in the top of the manuscript box, before sending to the printer. If applicable, be sure to specify what is the most important subject when alterations are required. IF you are providing the half-tones, they should be trimmed and affixed to (or produced/saved as part of) the manuscript page, as a part of the camera ready manuscript,  to avoid additional expense.  

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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/tips.html

August 2003, V2#8: Marketing Sunday, Jan 11 2009 

Join email lists that have the same subject matter as your book.  After getting an idea of the type of information that is posted and the rules, send an email to the list(s) about your new publication.  You might start at http://groups.yahoo.com or http://www.egroups.com

May 2005, V4#5: Genealogy Monday, Jan 5 2009 

Still looking for that lost ancestor?  When you run across the right surname in a general area at the correct time, never discard this information.  This data may be the same family (yea!) or different (boo!), but one can rarely tell when finding the data originally.  Likewise, a group that appears not to be related when the information is found, may be related and you uncover the link ten years later.  Don’t rely on research data sheets to go back and find information you uncovered 20 years ago: records get misplaced, misfiled, moved, go through natural deterioration, in some cases are discarded or destroyed, not to mention acts of God or vandalism.

June 2004, V3#6: Genealogy Sunday, Jan 4 2009 

Have an “ancestor swap”.  Have a pre-determined time period that you and a fellow researcher (or group) works on your line while you work on theirs.  This can sometimes produce better results than just “picking their brain” for helpful suggestions on a problem you have.

March 2004, V3#3: Genealogy Sunday, Jan 4 2009 

Look to local organizations, senior/ethnic/church centers, colleges, libraries, trade schools, etc. to see what type (if any) genealogy instruction/teachers they have and/or offer.  You may be surprised at the active genealogy community you find.

October 2007, V6#10: Computer Tuesday, Dec 30 2008 

Consider joining (or starting) a computer support group. Genealogy, history, book, writing, etc. – they all have clubs, classes, and get-togethers – consider one that can help you with computers!

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