February 2005, V4#2: Design Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Photo thoughts: The author, will be the person with the final say as to what  goes into the printed book.  While many families would love to see every photo available in print, this is rarely economical.  Because of this, the author may have some major decisions on what “makes the cut”.  Final decisions should include not only the quality and subject of the photograph, which may effect the tone of the picture page, but also who is in the photo.  Economically, printed photographs will be black and white.  Since not everyone has an eye for what color photos will look like in black and white, the author may get an idea by converting it.  They can either digitize it and change the color file to grayscale, or place the photo on a b/w copy machine.  A color picnic picture in a sun dappled glade may seem perfect in composition, tone, and quality, but may not be a very good black and white.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://gregathcompany.com/udo.html

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February 2005, V4#2: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Color photos in black and white

Wonder what a color photograph would look like as a black and white print?  No need to wonder!  Digitize your photograph with the method of your choice (scan or take a digital photo of it).  Open the graphics program of your choice (MS Paintbrush, Photoshop, PrintArtist, etc.) and look around in the different menus.  Open your color photograph file.  Most, if not all, graphics programs will have an area that shows your color photograph as color (or RGB, CYMK, etc.).  In or near this notation there will be a way to change it to grayscale.  For computer beginners a quick way to define Grayscale (computer speak) for “black and white photograph”, while black and white options will drop out all gray tones and convert color to either black or white.  Choose grayscale and read and answer any computer dialog boxes that come up carefully (such as “do you want to discard color data”).  Remember as long as you don’t save your changes over the original file, you can try almost anything without loosing your original file.  Once the photo is “black and white” (grayscale) you’ll know if it will look good, bad, or OK in b/w print.  You can save this file over the original color or “save as” a different name, etc.