June 2004, V3#6: Define Tuesday, Jan 27 2009 

Call-outs: Brief passages of text lifted from within the publication placed in larger type size (and occasionally font) to gain attention.  They are often inserted into the text (divided by the change of font/size, sometimes boxed, or with other graphics) as an element which breaks the text or copy.  Usually, it is “teaser” copy – attention-getting and draws readers into the item.

June 2003, V2#6: Design Sunday, Jan 11 2009 

Simple artwork (map, coat of arms, etc.) or clip art (general books, children, calligraphy graphics, etc.) sometimes adds to any book. It also serves as great filler for white space that may appear at the bottom of a page or end of a chapter.

Artwork should be clear, dark (but not too dark – don’t choose a graphic that covers ½ the page in black ink).  Depending on your printer/publishers needs they should either be attached to the manuscript or preferably sized for the space in which it will appear. Should you possess an artistic talent or have relatives or friends that do, you may wish to include these.
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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/tips.html 

December 2006, V5#12: Computer Saturday, Dec 27 2008 

99.9% of the books we produce are from Microsoft Word. However, it will depend on what the focus of your book is, as well as what software you are familiar with, and how much work you want the software to do for you. For instance, if the book is to contain many charts, a program that is geared toward generating these charts would be important. If you are working toward mainly fact oriented and are hoping the program will organize a manuscript, a program such as Family Tree Maker might be best. If you are looking for word processing and are familiar with the Corel family of products, you may not want to learn Microsoft Office. If you are wanting to go with fancy margins, clip art, photos, charts, tables, graphic elements on each page, etc., Microsoft Publisher may be the way to go. The bottom line, like so many other decisions comes down to you. It’s hard to beat making a wish list (I want the program to be able to…) and then looking for a product that fits best. Other factors, besides current software knowledge may be cost for new software, compatibility (if looking toward a hybrid or e-book).

Overall software we utilize most (remember, this doesn’t mean they are the best for you):

Manuscript: Microsoft Word (other Office programs such as Excel, Access, Publisher, and FrontPage can be helpful or used with Word, depending on project.)

Photographs: Adobe Photoshop

“Genealogy” Program (Charts, etc.): Family Tree Maker

July 2005, V4#7: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Send pictures via email without attachments

Most folks learn early how to send photos by attachment with emails.  However, not everyone opens attachments due to virus concerns.  What to do?  Find out how to embed the photo in the email itself.  Please find general Outlook Express instructions below (NOTE: all choices listed below will not be available unless you are in an outgoing email box/window):

Double check to see your are in html email format by clicking the “Format” pull down menu – a dot should be by Rich Text (HTML) – if it is not, click it and the dot will move.  Next, place your cursor in the email where you want the photo to go, then click the “Insert” menu and choose picture – this will bring up a “Picture” window from which you will click the “Browse” button.  This brings up an “Open” window.  In this window, you will go through your files to find the one you want to use.  Once you have selected the file, click the “Open” button at the bottom of the window, then click the “OK” button.  This should place your photo where your cursor was.

February 2005, V4#2: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Color photos in black and white

Wonder what a color photograph would look like as a black and white print?  No need to wonder!  Digitize your photograph with the method of your choice (scan or take a digital photo of it).  Open the graphics program of your choice (MS Paintbrush, Photoshop, PrintArtist, etc.) and look around in the different menus.  Open your color photograph file.  Most, if not all, graphics programs will have an area that shows your color photograph as color (or RGB, CYMK, etc.).  In or near this notation there will be a way to change it to grayscale.  For computer beginners a quick way to define Grayscale (computer speak) for “black and white photograph”, while black and white options will drop out all gray tones and convert color to either black or white.  Choose grayscale and read and answer any computer dialog boxes that come up carefully (such as “do you want to discard color data”).  Remember as long as you don’t save your changes over the original file, you can try almost anything without loosing your original file.  Once the photo is “black and white” (grayscale) you’ll know if it will look good, bad, or OK in b/w print.  You can save this file over the original color or “save as” a different name, etc.

September 2004, V3#9: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Print Screen

Lots of computer conversations contain something like “You know when it does/looks like this/that?” Many times the answer is a no because there wasn’t enough (or sometimes too much) description involved.  Use the print screen to show people what you mean – it is a several step process:

  • Locate/Produce on the screen the elements/situation you wish to print out, then tap (on the keyboard) your print screen button.  It is usually somewhere to the right of your normal typing keys and may be abbreviated such as “Prt Scrn”.

  • Next, you need to open a blank file in a program that is graphics capable (not notepad or WordPad) such as Word, FrontPage, etc.  Print screen can also be added to a file that contains other things.

  • Make sure you have a blinking cursor in the file area and left click the paste button (usually looks like a clip board).

  • Save and/or print the file to use in conversation.

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