February 2017 E-Zine Tuesday, Feb 7 2017 

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What’s It Mean? A-Z
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Paper Grain: The direction most of the fibers within paper generally lie, corresponding to the direction of their flow on the papermaking machine.

Paper Opacity: Nontransparent property which prevents or reduces “show through” of printing from the book side of the next sheet.

Terms marked with an asterisk (*) are not generally used in our office.

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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at
http://www.gregathcomany.com/info/dictionary and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/info/dictionary/writers.html

Run across a word that you don’t understand? Try us – email us your word, term or phrase and we will see if we can shed some light on the matter!
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Design Inspiration
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Via digital watermark consider adding monograms, coats of arms, or book subject/part wallpaper designs to some, or all pages.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/service/printing/watermark.html
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Book Manufacturing Concepts
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Too much of a good thing: While technology exists to jam pack content on a page, and layer it with digital watermarks, don’t use it in such a way that it splits the reader’s attention too much. You don’t want readers feeling like they have a puzzle book that is hard to read.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/service/printing/watermark.html
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Marketing advice
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When using book content online (marketing or sharing), do Copyright protect yourself by placing information in a watermark on each page/image. Visit a few examples on our website: Alexander Index (PDF), Green Index (PDF), Chute Cover (JPG)

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/service/printing/watermark.html
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Genealogy ideas
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Did you know the Library and Archives of Canada is digitizing (and making available) WWI soldier information: http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/first-world-war/first-world-war-1914-1918-cef/Pages/canadian-expeditionary-force.aspx

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Have a tip?  e-mail us
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Computer aid!?!
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Looking for other ways to have your manuscript “at hand”? A tablet may be a better compromise between a desk or laptop and a phone. Again, Android users can download MS Word app for free, while Windows users can access MS Word for free, while online. Many of today’s tablets can also attach keyboards, mice and wireless printers with ease while having robust memory (both speed and capacity).

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November, 2013 Electronic Magazine – Define Friday, Nov 1 2013 

Bleed: A printed image that extends beyond the trim edge of a sheet of paper or cover.

*Blueline: For Gregath use, see ARCBelow is a definition from “The What Shall I Write Handbook”, Corrine Russell, 1992, that is a good addition to our ARC entry:

“Bluelines are page proofs. They represent your last chance to review copy looking for errors.  Depending on the printing process your printer uses, bluelines may be expensive to produce, and many printers will not provide them unless you request them.  If printers do provide them, they may be expensive, so ask first.  Bluelines may be a good idea if you have a lot of photographs, for bluelines present your only opportunity to see photographs in place.  Check them carefully.  Make sure they are in the correct position, and that they are not upside down or turned backward.  Because bluelines are so expensive to produce, now is the time to start editing and proofreading. Unless they are printer’s errors, changes made at this point cost you dearly.”

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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at
http://www.gregathcomany.com/info/dictionary and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/info/dictionary/writers.html

February 2013 E-Zine (V12#2): Production Monday, Feb 11 2013 

Some ideas for Electronic edition publications

  • Cross link jargon with glossary entries.

  • Cross link family members and/or multiple entries.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design/digital

August E-Zine Note Saturday, Aug 4 2012 

The August issue of our E-Magazine is now available through our website. We will not be breaking it out this month. Thank you, in advance, for understanding and clicking!

May 2012 E-Zine (V11#5): Define Monday, May 7 2012 

Writer’s Lingo
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*Exceptions list: A list of elements that are “exceptions to the rule” – the writer’s and/or editor’s rule for the publication.  For example, it may be decided that county and married will be abbreviated, however for transcribed documents, all spellings and abbreviations should be left the same.

*Flush left/right: See justify

Terms marked with an asterisk (*) are not generally used in our office.

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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at http://www.gregathcompany.com/gloss.html and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/glosswrite.html

Run across a word that you don’t understand?  Try us – email us your word, term or phrase and we will see if we can shed some light on the matter!

February 2012 E-Zine (V11#2): Define Monday, Feb 20 2012 

Writer’s Lingo
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*Display type: Type used as attention getters, larger than regular text – usually from 14-72 point size. See Serif & Sans-Serif

Drop Cap: A Capital letter, traditionally the first letter of a chapter/section, that is enlarged to “drop” below the text in the rest of the line. Example “U” to the right.

Terms marked with an asterisk (*) are not generally used in our office.

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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at http://www.gregathcompany.com/gloss.html and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/glosswrite.html

Run across a word that you don’t understand?  Try us – email us your word, term or phrase and we will see if we can shed some light on the matter!