November 2006, V5 #11: Production Friday, Mar 20 2009 

Hybrids Continued:  Disks can be placed in envelopes or slim-line jewel cases to be delivered (or shrink wrapped) with printed books, or spindles may be attached to the end sheets to secure a CD in a hybrid book. Content ideas for this include:

  • Containing GEDCOM files (alone, or in addition to other formats) so readers can update and add information in a variety of genealogy programs including Family Tree Maker

E-books fitting this have also been known to be sold as a stand alone book or even as an “add on” price to the standard book retail.

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February 2005, V4#2: Production Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Include all your photos in a hybrid “printed” book: For the author that would also love to see every photo available in print – a book with accompanying CD may be the answer.  Select the “cream of the crop” to be printed into the actual book.  The CD – which can be attached to the book via envelope or spindle – can contain a wealth of digital information.  Photos galore and/or original document scans, GEDCOM files, author notes on theories, etc.

April 2004, V3#4: Production Tuesday, Jan 27 2009 

Mixed Media Books: Authors who have opted for a traditionally printed book should not overlook the possibility of including additional material on CD with their books.  This can be done totally separately or with an envelope (or spindle) affixed to the book itself (generally inside the back cover).  The author can include files of anything that was “cut” from the book, more reference, further stories & details, links to favorite places, artwork, GEDCOM, etc.

February 2006, V5#2: Computer Friday, Dec 26 2008 

Organization – part 4

Do you have a lot of photos that have been given to you, you’ve taken, or scanned?  If so, they could be slowing your computer down.  Additionally, if the only copy of a photo you have is on your hard drive, we really don’t want to think what will happen if the computer crashes.  If you have the budget and don’t mind new hardware, there are several excellent back up systems you can purchase and install to take care of knowing your photos are safe.  But what about those of us with less than 40% hard drive space open?  It’s time to file your photos!  One of the easiest ways with today’s technology is with a USB drive (starting at $20).  Once you have tamed the photos and put them into file folders, simply plug the drive into your computer, open up its’ window and a window that shows your photos and drag and drop.  It is suggested that you keep the drive with a general table of contents to make retreval/enjoyment fairly easy.  Another excellent way to file photos is by CD. Once you have your photos on removable storage media (drives or disks), it is up to you whether to keep them on your computer.

While you can use this filing tactic with any type of files, currently photos are the universal memory hog.  If you do digital video; have your genealogy back to the 1600 (including lots of collateral lines) in GEDCOM, etc.; have all your audio collection in the hard drive; etc. all of these may be filed similar to the photo example above.

Old School Tip: Were you computing at home in the 1980s?  Still have those large floppy boxes?  If so, they make excellent CD storage – with or without the jewel cases!

Please Note: Due to the newness of digital storage, it is important to keep your storage up to date.  Some of us still have large floppy disks with data on them – and no where to use them!

March 2005, V4#3: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

A large number of genealogists are taking advantage of the resources of the internet.  Just because you can find a document or GEDCOM online today doesn’t mean it will be there (or free of charge) tomorrow or 20 years from now.  Because of this, it is a good idea to treat computer print outs for your files/archives to reduce their acid level as much as is comfortable implementing.  Here are a few tips:

  • use acid free paper

  • only print on one side

  • only run the paper through the printer once

  • if you don’t use only acid free paper, you might invest in a second printer that uses only acid free

  • when buying a new printer consider the composition of the ink it uses

  • if possible, take a “junk” print out from the printer and wet it down to test it’s water resistance – if it runs, you need to select another printer for your file copies

  • when making notations on the print outs, make sure to use archival quality ink pens (widely available, if in doubt – head for the scrapbooking section)

  • don’t use paperclips, staples, rubber bands, adhesive (unless archival and absolutely needed), post-it notes, etc.

  • store in acid free folders, etc.

  • keep temperature and humidity steady and comfortable.

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