September 2004, V3#9: Marketing Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

When marketing a book, try to keep all of your author produced material to a general theme concerning format.  This might include choosing a paper/card stock color, keeping the major amount of your fonts the same (many even make sure it matches the book).  You may even choose a “theme” (ready made design – often involving graphics)  from a publishing program and carry it throughout.  Like any large retailer, this “small stuff” will help build what is called Name Brand Recognition.  When they see the envelope in the mail, they know without even looking it’s from you.  If they see a flyer they know it’s about the book without reading it.  Many “repeat authors” even carry the design over to other projects.  Some keep the exact same design format, others change one or two elements such as color or headline font.

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June 2004, V3#6: Define Tuesday, Jan 27 2009 

Call-outs: Brief passages of text lifted from within the publication placed in larger type size (and occasionally font) to gain attention.  They are often inserted into the text (divided by the change of font/size, sometimes boxed, or with other graphics) as an element which breaks the text or copy.  Usually, it is “teaser” copy – attention-getting and draws readers into the item.

March 2004, V3#3: Design Tuesday, Jan 27 2009 

Make your cover and title page special:

In today’s world where it is fairly easy to “typeset” on the computer, don’t settle for only text on your book cover.  While some binding types don’t economically lend themselves to anything but text, with the right budget or the type of binding to best fit your expectations, the sky is the limit.  We suggest utilizing different fonts, and/or adding dingbats/wingdings as decorative “bullets”, clip art, drawings, photos, backgrounds and/or borders to your cover (again not all of these elements can be used on all bindings).  If a special cover layout is put together, it is also nice to match to some extent the title page.  The title page may match with font and layout, but drop border, background, and other graphic elements.

January 2009, V8#1: Design Thursday, Jan 8 2009 

Layout your work

Basic layout formats include a single block/column and two columns of the same width for books. Generally books no larger than 8.5×11″ don’t have more than two columns because it is rarely economical. Depending on your content and format selections, the question of economics for one and two column may change.

Basic design elements that will be on nearly every page:

  • header

  • footer

  • page numbers

  • font style(s)

  • font size(s)

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design/layout.html
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June 2008, V7#6: Computer Saturday, Jan 3 2009 

MS Office – Format Paint

A good thing (in my book) is when you can get away with setting variables once and not having to do it again. To that end, I bring up the “format paint” option.
 
If you have a paragraph (or several) that are formatted just right and one (or more) that are not. Try using format paint:
Format Paint Illustration
Place your cursor in a paragraph that is formatted great.
Go up and click the button, just right of “paste”.
Next, highlight all the text you want formatted properly. This should make the highlighted text format correctly as you have “painted” it with the great format.
This doesn’t work with all formatting items, especially the advanced ones, but it does most everything found on the formatting tool bar – font size, type, underline, etc.
 
The paint only works for the next cursor placement. If you want to repeat the format paint – such as changing the person headline on each page, double click the format paint button. Everywhere your cursor highlights will reflect the new format until you either hit your Esc key, or double click the paint button again.

August 2006, V5#8: Computer Saturday, Dec 27 2008 

Does it seem like every document or web page you open has smaller text then the last? If your mouse of choice has a wheel (“wheel mouse”), you may be in luck. In at least Microsoft Word and Internet Explorer, this trick works like a dream (most of the time): When you want to see the text larger on a page or document you are viewing, be sure your mouse pointer is somewhere on the “page” in question, hold down your control key and move your wheel away from you (while holding the mouse still). This should zoom the text in direct relation to how far you move the wheel. The reverse is true if moving the wheel toward you. Try this in your favorite program – it might work there too!

August 2003, V2#8: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Almost all programs will allow you to adjust the font size to some extent or another.  Production programs such as Acrobat, FrontPage, Print Artist, Publisher, Excel, Corel Draw, etc. usually give the most control.  Internet programs (with the exception of outgoing html email) are a bit different.

The Rule of Thumb: always look at your pull down menus!  Most programs have a menu that has to do with viewing or formatting (many times both).  Click them to see if there are font changing options.

June 2003, V2#6: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Font Type in Microsoft Internet Explorer

Much of what you see online has the font pre-defined by the person who wrote the page.  However, you might be surprised at the amount of text that is not.  For text that a font hasn’t been chosen, your program assigns and shows the default font.  If you have a font you love to read and it is easy for you, or it shows up larger due to point size ratio, you may want to change the default font.  How to:

click on the “tools” pull down menu then click on “(internet) options”.  The dialog box your get has many tabs at the top, if you are not looking at the “general” tab, click it.  Near the bottom of this tab there is a row of buttons, click on the “fonts” button.  Doing this brings up the fonts box.  Select your favorite font in both lists, click OK, then OK and you’ve done it.

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