June 2005, V4#6: Production Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

To test the grain of paper use one of the following:

  1. Moisten two right-angle edges of a sheet, and press between fingers.  As the sheet dries, the edge across the grain will be wavy, the edge with the grain will be straight.

  2. Tear the sheet in two directions.  It tears straighter and cleaner with the grain.

  3. Fold the sheet in two directions.  It folds easier and smoother with the grain.

End-use need, design considerations, print quality and budgetary needs should go into deciding what paper to use.

-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-
This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/archival.html

Advertisements

June 2005, V4#6: Define Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Against the Grain: Folding, scoring, binding, or printing at right angles to the alignment of the fibers of the paper.

May 2005, V4#5: Production Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Paper Grain Direction:  All papers have a grain direction.  When the grain runs along the longest dimension of the sheet, the paper is “long grain”.  Grain is seldom a factor in offset printing, however it is a major consideration in binding.  Binderies prefer long grain since paper offers the least resistance in the same direction as most fibers in a sheet.  Also, pages in books tend to lie flat better when they are made with, rather than against the grain.  For saddle stitched books, a stronger book is produced with long grain, due to the fold being across the grain, but it doesn’t lay as flat.  Short grain paper is has difficulty maintaining dimensional stability and may result in more book problems such as wrinkled pages, etc.

December 2003, V2#12: Production Thursday, Jan 22 2009 

Binding

If the book is saddle-stitched, the pages are loaded into a machine that collates, folds and staples the pages and cover into completed books.  For a do it yourself version, print your pages 2 up, collate them together with a card stock cover, fold in the middle and use a saddle back stapler to finish.

May 2008, V7#5: Genealogy Wednesday, Jan 7 2009 

Back to basics: Consider buying a box of #10 envelopes. They fit inside a standard business envelope (#12) without folding. A folded SASE adds more thickness than a folded letter in a flat SASE. This sometimes causes envelopes to get caught in automated machinery. This is a good addition to your “tool box” for queries and SASE.