September 2015 Ezine – Book Production Wednesday, Sep 2 2015 

One thing, sometimes overlooked, is that the overall book format(s) may alter both production and shipping costs: If a large part of your sales may be shipped, consider both finished book height and width, as well as page count (depth) and explore packaging and shipping costs. QR codes, bonus material URL, or additional media can be used to cut the total size/weight without reducing the content.

-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-
This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/service/marketing/bookselling.html

Electronic Magazine – October 2014 v13#10: Marketing Monday, Nov 3 2014 

To offset the flat set-up fee is might be budgeted as promotion expense, seek a patron to pay for it (underwrite or sponsor), or offer “set up rebate incentive” based on the number of orders on a given date: The more books ordered by a certain date, the bigger the rebate returned with their book.

-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-
This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/pod

Electronic Magazine – September 2014 v13#9: Production Thursday, Sep 4 2014 

With GCI new base set-up fee of $25.00, don’t forget that one easy way to reduce the cost per book is to order more books. If you publish 25 books, the set-up cost adds $1 per book, if you order 250 books the per book share of the set up fee is only a dime ($.10). While the set up fee is a flat rate, it divides into the quantity for a per book share. Additionally, as your publishing gets larger, you’ll save on printing and binding as bulk discounts are realized.

-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-
This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/service/marketing/bookselling.html

September 2004, V3#9: Design Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Top Design Ideas that COST, and some options that don’t: In today’s economy, there are lots of suggestions devoted to producing a quality book with as little cost involved to the author as possible – this issue is no exception.  However, many family projects are the culmination of a lifetime of work, many times where the author has been setting aside funds for publication for years.  Additionally, as a labor of love, some families can’t put a price on such a keepsake.  This month we’d like to offer a few suggestions if “money is no object” – and ways to make the book look that way.

  • Have a sheet for each book that is the edition number.  Each book will be 1 or 100, 2 of 100, 3 of 100, etc. (more economical – have a page “_____ of 100” and hand number in the blank once you have books.)

  • Add a photo, document, notes, etc. CD to the book.  Printing black and white photos? Include the color on on CD, etc.  The CD is a cost saver due to the fact that you don’t have to pay for the color printing, nor printing for everything you can stuff on a CD.

  • See Book Manufacturing Concepts V3#9 Production

November 2002: V1#3: Marketing Wednesday, Dec 24 2008 

When deciding on what the total cost (retail) for you book is to be you need to consider not only production cost but any additional postage during manufacturing or other hidden costs as well as delivery postage to your customers (if you plan to sell “postage included”).  In a genealogy or family history, it is not usually smart to try to recoup research, manuscript preparation or travel time and expense through your retail price.  However, one may wish, once they have established the “break even point” and what profit margin they wish to have they might want to add in “standard wholesale”.  In the book industry genre (topic, subject) wide, book stores and book dealers expect to be able to buy books at 40% off the retail sales price.  If you add 40% to what you feel you need from a book, then you will be getting a basic price for wholesale sales and that basic price+40% on retail sales.  This also gives you room to run special pricing if you desire such as a lower pre-publication price (discussed next month) or a sale at a family reunion, etc.