December 2004, V3#12: Define Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Credit lines: text that indicate where material came from.  Generally used for “extra” elements such as photographs and copies of original items.  i.e. “Courtesy of…,” “Permission to reprint this material comes from…,”, etc. a type of caption

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September 2004, V3#9: Marketing Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

When marketing a book, try to keep all of your author produced material to a general theme concerning format.  This might include choosing a paper/card stock color, keeping the major amount of your fonts the same (many even make sure it matches the book).  You may even choose a “theme” (ready made design – often involving graphics)  from a publishing program and carry it throughout.  Like any large retailer, this “small stuff” will help build what is called Name Brand Recognition.  When they see the envelope in the mail, they know without even looking it’s from you.  If they see a flyer they know it’s about the book without reading it.  Many “repeat authors” even carry the design over to other projects.  Some keep the exact same design format, others change one or two elements such as color or headline font.

June 2004, V3#6: Define Tuesday, Jan 27 2009 

Call-outs: Brief passages of text lifted from within the publication placed in larger type size (and occasionally font) to gain attention.  They are often inserted into the text (divided by the change of font/size, sometimes boxed, or with other graphics) as an element which breaks the text or copy.  Usually, it is “teaser” copy – attention-getting and draws readers into the item.

January 2009, V8#1: Design Thursday, Jan 8 2009 

Layout your work

Basic layout formats include a single block/column and two columns of the same width for books. Generally books no larger than 8.5×11″ don’t have more than two columns because it is rarely economical. Depending on your content and format selections, the question of economics for one and two column may change.

Basic design elements that will be on nearly every page:

  • header

  • footer

  • page numbers

  • font style(s)

  • font size(s)

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design/layout.html
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September 2004, V3#9: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Print Screen

Lots of computer conversations contain something like “You know when it does/looks like this/that?” Many times the answer is a no because there wasn’t enough (or sometimes too much) description involved.  Use the print screen to show people what you mean – it is a several step process:

  • Locate/Produce on the screen the elements/situation you wish to print out, then tap (on the keyboard) your print screen button.  It is usually somewhere to the right of your normal typing keys and may be abbreviated such as “Prt Scrn”.

  • Next, you need to open a blank file in a program that is graphics capable (not notepad or WordPad) such as Word, FrontPage, etc.  Print screen can also be added to a file that contains other things.

  • Make sure you have a blinking cursor in the file area and left click the paste button (usually looks like a clip board).

  • Save and/or print the file to use in conversation.

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