June 2017 E-magazine Wednesday, Jun 28 2017 

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What’s It Mean? A-Z
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Post binding:  See Chicago Screw

Point: Unit of thickness, one thousandth of an inch (0.001″).

Terms marked with an asterisk (*) are not generally used in our office.

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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at
http://www.gregathcomany.com/info/dictionary and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/info/dictionary/writers.html

Run across a word that you don’t understand? Try us – email us your word, term or phrase and we will see if we can shed some light on the matter!
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Design Inspiration
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When designing mailing tools, consider the number your are mailing at one time as well as the number of times you may mail over the next year. Utilizing a permit imprint saves you time placing stamps on each item as well as saving money. There are several things you can do with an imprint that will have to be added to your camera ready layout. *******

In addition to retail postage (stamps), if you are mailing more than 200 at one time, Gregath can get you a marketing discount and you can skip the stamps. If mailing more than 500 at one time, first class mail imprint (no stamps) may be an economical option.

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More information can be found at
http://www.gregathcompany.com/service/shipping/bulkmail.html
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Book Manufacturing Concepts – not in this issue
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Marketing advice
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For your information – in case you hadn’t noticed yet: USPS has renamed their business class mail rate again. Add standard mail rate to history along with third class, second class, and bulk mail. For business imprint, Standard Mail is still current, with USPS instructing the change to Marketing mail in the future.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/service/shipping/bulkmail.html
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Genealogy ideas
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The Connecticut State Library is producing a fine online resource for WWI information: http://ctinworldwar1.org/. This is an ongoing effort that may be a goldmine for some.

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Have a tip?  e-mail us

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Computer aid!?!
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As we all continue to look at getting newer operating systems (OS), like Windows 10, keep in mind that not all of your old programs may work on the new OS – even anti-virus subscriptions.

November & December 2016 E-Zine Tuesday, Dec 13 2016 

This busy season we are announcing both issues can be found on our website or in a Facebook note. We realize this may not “deliver it to your door” like placing the text in three different places online, but think it might be worth the little extra effort for blog readers.

March and April Electronic Magazine Links Friday, Apr 13 2012 

March got away from us so here are links, to our website, for the magazine for two months:

March Edition

April Edition

February 2007, V6#2: Genealogy Wednesday, Jan 7 2009 

The following was published in The Arkansas Genealogical Society E-zine, Volume 1, Number 4 (November 2006)

Contributed by Carolyn Earle Billingsley

Tips for Arkansas Researchers

Adding images to your family history should be part of every genealogist’s repertoire. Images like maps, pedigree charts, diagrams, and photos add interest and a personal touch to your research. But how many of you have thought about postcards?

Sometimes you don’t have an image of your grandfather visiting the courthouse, but you can still spice up your family history with a postcard image of that courthouse. In my case, for example, I don’t have a photo of my parents sitting on the steps of the high school where they graduated back in the 1940s, but I was able to find a postcard of the school that dated to that era.

You might be surprised how many post cards there are out there. E-bay is an excellent place for finding them.

And now Ancestry.com has a large collection of postcards online. Here’s their press release about this new collection:

Source Information: Ancestry.com. Historical Postcards Collection, c. 1893-1963 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, Inc., 2006. Original data: Mary Martin Postcards (www.MaryLMartin.com), Perryville, MD, USA.

About Historical Postcards Collection, c. 1893-1963:

This database contains approximately 50,000 postcards dating from about 1893-1963. About three-quarters of the postcards contain pictures from places within the United States, while the remaining fourth contains pictures from abroad. Information provided about each postcard includes:

Place information (city/town, county, state/province, country)
Caption
Postcard era (year range from which the postcard may be dated)

This database is primarily useful for obtaining a photograph or picture of a specific place in time. If you do not already have pictures of the places your ancestors lived, historical postcards are a good alternative to personal photos.

Ancestry’s collection even has an old postcard of the church my great-grandparents belonged to in Little Rock-and over 500 postcards of a variety of Arkansas sites. I especially liked the 1915 card of the old Confederate Soldiers Home, which has long since been torn down. The image includes the back side of the card, with the written message was written, along with the old stamp and the postmark.

So look around your relatives’ houses, poke around flea markets, search the Internet, peruse e-Bay, and check out Ancestry.com for images to fill in those gaps in your family’s pictorial history.