February 2005, V4#2: Genealogy Sunday, Jan 4 2009 

If you or your family have been collecting documentation for quite sometime, you should consider replacing your copies that are over 20 years old.  As each copy loses clarity, it is suggested preservation photocopying should be considered to reduce the times the copy will need re-copied.  For more information visit the Library of Congress online.

Advertisements

September 2004, V3#9: Genealogy Sunday, Jan 4 2009 

Many people when researching forget to use reference materials in concert.  While this sounds strange, sometimes it doesn’t even cross their minds.  Example: Found the ancestor in the census but that year doesn’t have everything you want (or you prefer more than one documented source) – look in other state, county, and local records as well as local newspapers.  Could they have belonged to a local church or (fraternal) organization?  Don’t leave these out of the search!

April 2004, V3#4: Genealogy Sunday, Jan 4 2009 

Have you checked out alternate Census options?  Don’t discount all census that were taken – in addition to state and federal options there are/were agricultural, etc. at different time periods.

December 2003, V2#12: Genealogy Saturday, Jan 3 2009 

Use any information you can find through LDS as a starting point.  Information supplied by members are not always totally documented.  Always construct your own burden of proof.

July 2003, V2#7: Genealogy Saturday, Jan 3 2009 

While becoming that student of history we have already suggested, is your lost ancestor in America during the time the US was giving out free land to it’s citizens?  If so, your next stop should be the homestead records!  This little utilized collection of documents and information is housed at the national archives and has not been reproduced or indexed in any wide reaching way.  The Homestead National Monument has begun exploring the best way to augment NARA general paper preservation process by replicating them in Nebraska.

June 2003, V2#6: Genealogy Saturday, Jan 3 2009 

Basic research rule that is most commonly overlooked – no matter how much material you check, keep a record of what you have checked.

Basic research rule that is almost as most commonly overlooked – cite your sources.  Make sure when you locate a document, reference, or listing that you take detailed information about not only what reference you were using, but where and when it was found.

Keep these rules in mind and your search may be a much more orderly and enjoyable experience :o)

September 2008, V7#9: Computer Saturday, Jan 3 2009 

If you haven’t looked into www.footnote.com yet, take a look. They have lots of plans and are growing all the time. Some things you can see for free, others are subscription.

May 2008, V7#5: Computer Saturday, Jan 3 2009 

In a MS Word file, how do I tell where in the document my cursor is at?

In Microsoft word, look in the lower left – in the gray areas above the “start” button.

Right above the “start” button it shows you what page your cursor is on.
Moving right, it shows what section you are in. If all goes right, you should always be in section 1.
The third notation (working left to right) on that line shows you again what page your cursor is on, then a forward slash and the number of pages in the file. You should see a dotted line 4 text lines from the bottom of the screen (above the red line). This demarks the page break in this type of page view.

August 2006, V5#8: Computer Saturday, Dec 27 2008 

Does it seem like every document or web page you open has smaller text then the last? If your mouse of choice has a wheel (“wheel mouse”), you may be in luck. In at least Microsoft Word and Internet Explorer, this trick works like a dream (most of the time): When you want to see the text larger on a page or document you are viewing, be sure your mouse pointer is somewhere on the “page” in question, hold down your control key and move your wheel away from you (while holding the mouse still). This should zoom the text in direct relation to how far you move the wheel. The reverse is true if moving the wheel toward you. Try this in your favorite program – it might work there too!

December 2005, V4#12: Computer Friday, Dec 26 2008 

Organization – part 2

Once you have decided whether to have one main organization structure, or divide files by type and then organize, it’s time to do some serious directory making and/or “moving in”.

Don’t start moving your files until you have your main directory structure thought out.  For instance, don’t make “photo” and “graphic” file folders in My Documents/My Pictures and the move all your graphics, then decide to make folders in photo for subjects, dates, etc. – this would make you more work by having to move the same file every time you choose do divide it more.  First take a look at your overall structure you have decided, think about the type of files you have and/or may be making – plan a structure and file folders that will make items easy to find.  Once the structure is in place, you can start moving in.

One easy way to move files follows: click Start, then click My Documents.  From there, double click a file folder you wish to move into.  Continue double clicking into sub folders until you get to a folder you plan on moving files into.  Next go back and click Start then My Documents again.  If files need to be moved from here just place the mouse on the item, hold down the left mouse button and drag it to the other file folder window and release.

Continue repeating steps until files are in correct folders.  Don’t worry if you find as you move you need more folders, just make them :o)

Note – if you find you’ve placed a file folder in the wrong place, the whole folder can be moved just like a single file: drag and drop.

More next month…

« Previous PageNext Page »