April 2005, V4#4: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

What time is it!?!

Don’t forget to double check your computer clock around daylight savings time.  Many things about a computer system may cause you problems if your clock setting is very far off – say an hour.  If you’ve moved your computer, or had a massive electrical outage, you will need to manually adjust your clock as well.  Most newer systems automatically adjust for daylight savings time, but if your computer doesn’t, here’s how to fix it:

From the desktop, select (click or double click – depending on your set up) “my computer”, select “control panel”, select “date and time” – this should bring up the date/time window.  Click in the time box and change the time (you can also drag the clock hands).  While you have the window open, you may want to look around in the box (and tabs).  If your computer didn’t adjust at daylight savings time, there may be a simple check box you can click so it will adjust in the future.  Likewise, if you are in an area that doesn’t observe DST and your computer is switching on you, you can click the box to deselect this option.

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November 2004, V3#11: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Change your screen saver

Right click any empty space on your desktop (what you see when you turn your computer on).  Click “properties” – when the box comes up, click the screen saver tab at the top of the box.  There is a scroll box (with down arrow on the right side) that contains lots of options.  Once you have picked one you like (they preview in the box), you might take the time to explore the other options the box provides.  Last step is to click the OK button.

October 2004, V3#10: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Change your wallpaper

Right click any empty space on your desktop (what you see when you turn your computer on).  Click “properties” – when the box comes up, click the wall paper tab at the top of the box.  There is a scroll box (with down arrow on the right side) that contains lots of options.  Once you have picked one you like (they preview in the box), you might take the time to explore the other options the box provides.  Last step is to click the OK button.

October 2002, V1#2: Book Design Wednesday, Dec 24 2008 

If you are self-publishing (or vanity publishing) also sometimes known as desktop publishing, you may be keeping an eye on the bottom line.  Our company is always in search of the way to produce a great book while keeping costs down.  Because of this, when deciding on what size (finished dimensions – 6×9″, etc.) you may want to take into consideration how much information can fit on a page at what cost.  An example is that with our company a book that is 6×9″ and one that is 8½x11″ cost the same to produce, but the author can get much more text on the larger book page.  One argument is that the smaller book can have smaller margins, however when one diminishes the margins it disturbs the smoothness of the book.  White space is important to book design.  Additionally, almost every printer has some specification as to what margins he or she need and/or suggest.