November, 2013 Electronic Magazine – Define Friday, Nov 1 2013 

Bleed: A printed image that extends beyond the trim edge of a sheet of paper or cover.

*Blueline: For Gregath use, see ARCBelow is a definition from “The What Shall I Write Handbook”, Corrine Russell, 1992, that is a good addition to our ARC entry:

“Bluelines are page proofs. They represent your last chance to review copy looking for errors.  Depending on the printing process your printer uses, bluelines may be expensive to produce, and many printers will not provide them unless you request them.  If printers do provide them, they may be expensive, so ask first.  Bluelines may be a good idea if you have a lot of photographs, for bluelines present your only opportunity to see photographs in place.  Check them carefully.  Make sure they are in the correct position, and that they are not upside down or turned backward.  Because bluelines are so expensive to produce, now is the time to start editing and proofreading. Unless they are printer’s errors, changes made at this point cost you dearly.”

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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at
http://www.gregathcomany.com/info/dictionary and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/info/dictionary/writers.html

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August E-Zine Note Saturday, Aug 4 2012 

The August issue of our E-Magazine is now available through our website. We will not be breaking it out this month. Thank you, in advance, for understanding and clicking!

February 2012 E-Zine (V11#2): Define Monday, Feb 20 2012 

Writer’s Lingo
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*Display type: Type used as attention getters, larger than regular text – usually from 14-72 point size. See Serif & Sans-Serif

Drop Cap: A Capital letter, traditionally the first letter of a chapter/section, that is enlarged to “drop” below the text in the rest of the line. Example “U” to the right.

Terms marked with an asterisk (*) are not generally used in our office.

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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at http://www.gregathcompany.com/gloss.html and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/glosswrite.html

Run across a word that you don’t understand?  Try us – email us your word, term or phrase and we will see if we can shed some light on the matter!

January 2012 E-Zine (V11#12): Define Thursday, Dec 29 2011 

What’s It Mean? – Writer’s Lingo
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Desktop publishing: The use of a personal computer to bring together text and other elements (photos, graphics, etc.) into a camera-ready manuscript without using other resources (typesetter, paste-up, etc.

*Desktop publishing (2): The use of a personal computer to produce multiple copies of a manuscript to be bound in some method as books.

Terms marked with an asterisk (*) are not generally used in our office.

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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at http://www.gregathcompany.com/gloss.html and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/glosswrite.html

December 2011 E-Zine (V10#12): Define Wednesday, Nov 30 2011 

Writer’s Lingo:
Crop marks: lines indicating what part of the photograph to print. These are commonly placed directly on the face of the photograph with grease pencil (which will easily rub off later). Our company charges extra if many photos are submitted this way.
*Dead copy: Any previous drafts or copies that have been discarded once proof read and any changes have been completed. All drafts should be dated (easiest), marked or coded so the writer can be sure of working on the “current” and be able to see their progress in the older ones.
Terms marked with an asterisk (*) are not generally used in our office.
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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at http://www.gregathcompany.com/gloss.html and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/glosswrite.html

March 2005, V4#3: Design Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

If archival quality is important to the author, they should take a moment and define what exactly is important to them and why.  After this is complete, they can begin seeking printer/publishers and/or methods for their book production.  Always query about definition of archival words and jargon as they seem to vary widely – never assume.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/bookselling.html