Pre-Publication Sale – Early Landowners of Madison Co., KY Tuesday, Feb 17 2015 

Early Landowners in Madison County, Kentucky, by Robert P. HumphreEarlLOMadCoKYys, PhD, 2014. 8½x11″, softbound book, ISBN 978-1-936091-30-3, 94 pages, includes CD with custom maps: 13 quad maps dealing with this content.

If order is postmarked before March 2nd, discount price is only $20.00 with s&h ($12 Priority for first and $2 each additional).

Retail price (order # R3815) for soft cover is $25.00.

Special order POD hardbound is also available.

Order by mail at PO BOX 505, Wyandotte, OK 74370, or visit http://www.gregathcompany.com/catalog/books/Humphreys

The objective of this work was to identify any and all of the early land patents that were located (partially or completely) within present-day Madison County, Kentucky and to prepare an alphabetical index of these patents arranged by the name of each grantee. The patent database from which the Madison County patents were to be identified was the Virginia Series and Old Kentucky Series of patents for the State of Kentucky that are housed at the Kentucky Secretary of State Land Office in Frankfort, Kentucky. Confirmation that a patent was located within Madison County (completely or partially) was to be established by creating a series of maps depicting the approximate location of each patent within the county.

 

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New Jasper Co., MO Research Book Friday, Aug 7 2009 

Additions to Tombstone Inscriptions of Jasper County, Missouri
Volume 2
by John Schehrer
Copyright 2009
Go to Revisited 2008 book

Additions to Tombstone Inscriptions of Jasper County, Missouri Volume 2, by John Schehrer has now been published. Continuing his valuable service to the genealogy and family history community, Schehrer goes beyond the original published work that inspired this ongoing project. With publishing his book, Additions to Tombstone Inscriptions of Jasper County, Missouri Revisited, 2008, he began enriching the amount of genealogical information available, in print, for the researching public of Jasper County, Missouri. Schehrer’s inspiration was an earlier book series was compiled by Colleen Webb Belk and Jack Belk throughout the 1960s and early 1970s. His newest book includes additions since the Belk’s groundbreaking work as well as alternate information to the cemeteries of Saginaw and Wild Rose Cemeteries. However, most of the material published in this volume contain burials not previously published in the Belk series.

To make this work more comprehensive, the author has included data from the funeral home records from Hurlbut, Sevier and Knell. Some of this information was also cross checked with death certificates to provide the reader with more information. No original material from the Belk series has been included. Though researchers will find a few similar entries, Schehrer has included only the information he has witnessed and researched. Beginning genealogists may not recognize that recording differences from transcription errors, changes in records, and human interpretation of documents and stones are standard occurrences.

Schehrer traveled to many cemeteries in Jasper County, Missouri, including several graveyards that border the current county lines, surveying them for burials not included in the original Belk volumes. They include: Baptist, Cave Springs, Cedar Hill, Dudenville, Dudman, Friends, Green Lawn, Hackney, Mitchell, Mound, Oronogo, Saginaw, and Wild Rose.

This new publication measurers 8.5×11” and has a soft comb binding. Its’ 116 pages include an introduction by the author, table of contents, an author brief on each property, individual transcriptions by cemetery, and a surname index by cemetery. For more information, contact the Gregath Publishing Company at 918-542-4148, or visit them online.

September 2004, V3#9: Genealogy Sunday, Jan 4 2009 

Many people when researching forget to use reference materials in concert.  While this sounds strange, sometimes it doesn’t even cross their minds.  Example: Found the ancestor in the census but that year doesn’t have everything you want (or you prefer more than one documented source) – look in other state, county, and local records as well as local newspapers.  Could they have belonged to a local church or (fraternal) organization?  Don’t leave these out of the search!

May 2004, V3#5: Genealogy Sunday, Jan 4 2009 

Though you are probably already using US Gen Web Project (see previous tip), have you added your query/queries to the email lists that correspond geographically to your problem area(s)?  To get started, go to the county in question.  We suggest you then subscribe to their email list (see below for definition).  If you prefer not to, email the county coordinator with your query and request it be added to the email list.