July 2015 Magazine – Define A-Z Thursday, Jul 2 2015 

Four (4)/Full Color Separation: Each of the colors that make “full color” are separated in preparation to print separately – these layers make up the full color printed item.  A color photograph is reproduced in the print media through this process.

*Galley: A mock up of the books layouts. This layout doesn’t usually have final illustrations, artwork, or photographs. Galleys are rarely included in basic prices.

* term not normally used in our offices

-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-
For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at
http://www.gregathcomany.com/info/dictionary and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/info/dictionary/writers.html

Advertisements

Electronic Magazine – November 2014 v13#11: Computers Monday, Nov 3 2014 

Needing to migrate templates from older systems? One work-around is to open each and save a “blank copy” as a file, then open that file in the updates system and save as template once more.

November, 2013 Electronic Magazine – Define Friday, Nov 1 2013 

Bleed: A printed image that extends beyond the trim edge of a sheet of paper or cover.

*Blueline: For Gregath use, see ARCBelow is a definition from “The What Shall I Write Handbook”, Corrine Russell, 1992, that is a good addition to our ARC entry:

“Bluelines are page proofs. They represent your last chance to review copy looking for errors.  Depending on the printing process your printer uses, bluelines may be expensive to produce, and many printers will not provide them unless you request them.  If printers do provide them, they may be expensive, so ask first.  Bluelines may be a good idea if you have a lot of photographs, for bluelines present your only opportunity to see photographs in place.  Check them carefully.  Make sure they are in the correct position, and that they are not upside down or turned backward.  Because bluelines are so expensive to produce, now is the time to start editing and proofreading. Unless they are printer’s errors, changes made at this point cost you dearly.”

-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-
For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at
http://www.gregathcomany.com/info/dictionary and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/info/dictionary/writers.html

December 2011 E-Zine (V10#12): Define Wednesday, Nov 30 2011 

Writer’s Lingo:
Crop marks: lines indicating what part of the photograph to print. These are commonly placed directly on the face of the photograph with grease pencil (which will easily rub off later). Our company charges extra if many photos are submitted this way.
*Dead copy: Any previous drafts or copies that have been discarded once proof read and any changes have been completed. All drafts should be dated (easiest), marked or coded so the writer can be sure of working on the “current” and be able to see their progress in the older ones.
Terms marked with an asterisk (*) are not generally used in our office.
-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-
For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at http://www.gregathcompany.com/gloss.html and
http://www.gregathcompany.com/glosswrite.html

February 2005, V4#2: Design Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Photo thoughts: The author, will be the person with the final say as to what  goes into the printed book.  While many families would love to see every photo available in print, this is rarely economical.  Because of this, the author may have some major decisions on what “makes the cut”.  Final decisions should include not only the quality and subject of the photograph, which may effect the tone of the picture page, but also who is in the photo.  Economically, printed photographs will be black and white.  Since not everyone has an eye for what color photos will look like in black and white, the author may get an idea by converting it.  They can either digitize it and change the color file to grayscale, or place the photo on a b/w copy machine.  A color picnic picture in a sun dappled glade may seem perfect in composition, tone, and quality, but may not be a very good black and white.

-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-
This section is drawn from information online at http://gregathcompany.com/udo.html

January 2004, V3#1: Design Monday, Jan 26 2009 

Book Manufacturing Concepts

Most printer/publishers have the capabilities to print by many methods, we offer quality offset printing from camera ready copy, as it is the most cost-effective approach to a permanent ink printed book. Due to set-up costs, we must limit our smallest run to 100 books. With our 33 years experience, it is just recently that we have found what we feel is a viable alternative.  Always make sure companies you approach to publish define their method of reproduction if you are interested in your work standing the test of time.  It is amazing to us how many copy machines and their out-put are being sold as “printed”.

October 2008, V7#10: Genealogy Saturday, Jan 10 2009 

Use Funeral Homes When Researching

 Genealogists are fascinated with cemeteries.  Besides being the final resting place for ones ancestors, cemeteries provide vital information.  Tombstone and cemetery records often reveal more than death information.  Cemeteries, however, are not the only sources of information regarding the deceased.  Do not forget funeral homes. 

Funeral homes are another resource for providing family information.  Their records often contain biographical information not found on the deth certificate or in the obituary.  They may also have a copy of the funeral program, printed eulogies, as well as a copy of the death certificate and obituary. 

Funeral home records are private business documents.  You do not have a legal right to view them.  They are not covered by the Freedom of Information Act.  Most funeral directors, however, are individuals who are more than willing to help genealogists. 

Many funeral directors have allowed their records to be microfilmed.  Often genealogical societies have published the records.  For example, the Tulsa Genealogical Society has published 12 volumes of funeral home records.  The Lawton Ritter-Gray funeral home records to 1994 are on microfilm and available at the Lawton Public Library.

If you do not know what funeral home was used, the death certificate or obituary should provide this information.

If you are looking for a list of funeral homes and cemeteries currently operating, go to www.imortuary.com.  Select by location or browse the state and town.  The address, phone number, web address and location on a map are given. 

That web site is a quick and easy way to locate funeral homes and cemeteries throughout the country.  Memorial parks, such as Sunset Memorial (Lawton) are listed under funeral homes and not cemeteries. 

The site does not list all known cemeteries for an area.  Not included are rural, inactive, family and small cemeteries.  For example, Highland Cemetery (Lawton) is listed, but not the cemeteries in Cache, Indiahoma or Elgin.  Local funeral homes can often provide you with a list of local cemeteries.  They are experts on this subject. 

The National Yellow Book of Funeral Directors and The National Directory of Morticians, both published annually, are excellent print guides to funeral homes.  Arrangement is by state and town.  Genealogy libraries, including the Lawton Public Library, often own a copy. 

What if the funeral home is no longer in business? Again, ask the funeral home still in business as it may have the records of the old funeral homes or know where they may be located. 

(This information was taken from Paul Follett’s column Tree Tracers published in the Lawton Constitution on December 10, 2007.)

January 2007, V6#1: Genealogy Wednesday, Jan 7 2009 

Check with your local library, even if they don’t have a large genealogy section, to see what online services they offer. They can assist you with using WorldCat (http://www.worldcat.org) to see where the closest copy of particular books are available in public collections.

February 2005, V4#2: Genealogy Sunday, Jan 4 2009 

If you or your family have been collecting documentation for quite sometime, you should consider replacing your copies that are over 20 years old.  As each copy loses clarity, it is suggested preservation photocopying should be considered to reduce the times the copy will need re-copied.  For more information visit the Library of Congress online.

December 2002, V1#4: Genealogy Saturday, Jan 3 2009 

Having trouble deciphering old records?  In addition to spidery hand (which can’t be helped) and bad reproduction (you might seek out another copy – even in microfilm), a culprit may be differing styles of writing.  Check out information on old handwriting.  One example if the instance of double s’s (ss) was often written like a misshapen lowercase cursive “f”…

Next Page »