Electronic Magazine – August, 2014, v13#8: Computers Monday, Aug 11 2014 

Don’t forget that any clipart used in a book sold for profit may be subject to Copyright restrictions. Even books sold by 5013c organizations as “fund raisers” should keep this in consideration and check all sources accordingly.

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April 2004, V3#4: Define Tuesday, Jan 27 2009 

Art(work): Non-text material (in our shop, this excludes photographs) – may include such things as decorative lettering (not font related), drawings, ornamentation, tables, charts, sketches, maps, reproductions of documents, decorative borders, etc.

Clip Art: Commercially produced “stock” images, already prepared, many times found in collections.  Generally copyright free with some limitations, it can be “cut and pasted” directly into the publication

Line Art: Made of individual lines, no % shading or close line fill – unless special handling is required for a  (some very detailed older woodcuts, etc.), these do not add to cost of publication

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For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at http://gregathcompany.com/gloss.html and
http://gregathcompany.com/glosswrite.html

March 2004, V3#3: Design Tuesday, Jan 27 2009 

Make your cover and title page special:

In today’s world where it is fairly easy to “typeset” on the computer, don’t settle for only text on your book cover.  While some binding types don’t economically lend themselves to anything but text, with the right budget or the type of binding to best fit your expectations, the sky is the limit.  We suggest utilizing different fonts, and/or adding dingbats/wingdings as decorative “bullets”, clip art, drawings, photos, backgrounds and/or borders to your cover (again not all of these elements can be used on all bindings).  If a special cover layout is put together, it is also nice to match to some extent the title page.  The title page may match with font and layout, but drop border, background, and other graphic elements.

June 2003, V2#6: Design Sunday, Jan 11 2009 

Simple artwork (map, coat of arms, etc.) or clip art (general books, children, calligraphy graphics, etc.) sometimes adds to any book. It also serves as great filler for white space that may appear at the bottom of a page or end of a chapter.

Artwork should be clear, dark (but not too dark – don’t choose a graphic that covers ½ the page in black ink).  Depending on your printer/publishers needs they should either be attached to the manuscript or preferably sized for the space in which it will appear. Should you possess an artistic talent or have relatives or friends that do, you may wish to include these.
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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/tips.html 

December 2006, V5#12: Computer Saturday, Dec 27 2008 

99.9% of the books we produce are from Microsoft Word. However, it will depend on what the focus of your book is, as well as what software you are familiar with, and how much work you want the software to do for you. For instance, if the book is to contain many charts, a program that is geared toward generating these charts would be important. If you are working toward mainly fact oriented and are hoping the program will organize a manuscript, a program such as Family Tree Maker might be best. If you are looking for word processing and are familiar with the Corel family of products, you may not want to learn Microsoft Office. If you are wanting to go with fancy margins, clip art, photos, charts, tables, graphic elements on each page, etc., Microsoft Publisher may be the way to go. The bottom line, like so many other decisions comes down to you. It’s hard to beat making a wish list (I want the program to be able to…) and then looking for a product that fits best. Other factors, besides current software knowledge may be cost for new software, compatibility (if looking toward a hybrid or e-book).

Overall software we utilize most (remember, this doesn’t mean they are the best for you):

Manuscript: Microsoft Word (other Office programs such as Excel, Access, Publisher, and FrontPage can be helpful or used with Word, depending on project.)

Photographs: Adobe Photoshop

“Genealogy” Program (Charts, etc.): Family Tree Maker