November, 2013 Electronic Magazine – Define Friday, Nov 1 2013 

Bleed: A printed image that extends beyond the trim edge of a sheet of paper or cover.

*Blueline: For Gregath use, see ARCBelow is a definition from “The What Shall I Write Handbook”, Corrine Russell, 1992, that is a good addition to our ARC entry:

“Bluelines are page proofs. They represent your last chance to review copy looking for errors.  Depending on the printing process your printer uses, bluelines may be expensive to produce, and many printers will not provide them unless you request them.  If printers do provide them, they may be expensive, so ask first.  Bluelines may be a good idea if you have a lot of photographs, for bluelines present your only opportunity to see photographs in place.  Check them carefully.  Make sure they are in the correct position, and that they are not upside down or turned backward.  Because bluelines are so expensive to produce, now is the time to start editing and proofreading. Unless they are printer’s errors, changes made at this point cost you dearly.”

For other writing, printing, publishing, marketing lingo, check our glossaries at and


August 2005, V4#8: Design Thursday, Jan 29 2009 


When planning a book, one may need to consider whether to incorporate bleeds into the project.  If economy is a factor, the answer to the question is to achieve your ascetic goal some other way.  Work with your publisher on this factor is bleeds are really a high priority.  Sometimes impression area can be stretched to the point that by the time the binding trim has been taken the book looks like it was planned with bleeds – but economically, the underwriter avoided a costly option.

This section is drawn from information online at

August 2005, V4#8: Define Thursday, Jan 29 2009 

Bleed: A printed image that extends beyond the trim edge of a sheet of paper.