Current Publishing Service Sale Thursday, Jul 2 2015 

10%: Color for black and white

If color book page publishing in quantities of 10 or more, pay black and white prices for 10% of your total. The more you order, the more you save! This applies to any book pages (entire book or specified pages) ordered in color – binding prices remain the same. Examples:

  • Publish 10 books, pay 9 for color and 1 color book black and white cost.
  • Publish 100-109 books, get 10 color books at black and white cost.
  • Publish 210-219 books, get 21 color books for black and white.

To qualify for this special offer, you must do the following:

  • Specifically request this offer with your order/payment mailing.
  • Send your manuscript, mailing information, and payment to arrive at the publisher before August 31, 2015.
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May, 2014 Electronic Magazine – Computer Tuesday, May 20 2014 

Still thinking in black and white? The days of green and amber monitors are well past, as is unaffordable color computer copies. We live in a color world and while you may not be able to afford a full color printed book, consider using color in your sales items. Always check the price difference between color and black and white (from letterhead and envelopes to flyer and bookmarks) – the margin of savings may not equal the value loss.

May 2012 E-Zine (V11#5): Book Production Monday, May 7 2012 

When deciding to produce a full color book, or add a few color pages, remember that placement counts – a color section results in less insertion costs than the same number of pages sprinkled through out a book.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/colorpages.html

May 2006, V5#5: Design Friday, Jan 30 2009 

Lower cost alternative to color custom printed end sheets:

  • Hand color b/w end sheets in your your special books.

July 2005, V4#7: Production Thursday, Jan 29 2009 

Paper opacity is the lack of transparency that allows a sheet to conceal print on the opposite side.  weight, brightness, type of fiber and filler in testing can all greatly influence opacity.  Reflectance of paper is measured when backed successfully by a white body and a black body.  The ratio of these two measurements determines the opacity reading.  Typical opacity of 50# white offset is 88-90; 20# business paper is 84-88.  A quick and very basic “home” test is to print something large and black (black and white clip art and or various sized of bolded text) on a sheet of paper, place a blank sheet of the paper to be tested over this printed sheet.  Any print that happens to show through, will show a bit more if actually printed on the currently black paper.  For book printing, take your darkest page and try this test.  Many manuscript designers will change their manuscript elements to decrease the opacity needed for a nice book rather than pay the difference for higher opacity.

February 2005, V4#2: Design Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Photo thoughts: The author, will be the person with the final say as to what  goes into the printed book.  While many families would love to see every photo available in print, this is rarely economical.  Because of this, the author may have some major decisions on what “makes the cut”.  Final decisions should include not only the quality and subject of the photograph, which may effect the tone of the picture page, but also who is in the photo.  Economically, printed photographs will be black and white.  Since not everyone has an eye for what color photos will look like in black and white, the author may get an idea by converting it.  They can either digitize it and change the color file to grayscale, or place the photo on a b/w copy machine.  A color picnic picture in a sun dappled glade may seem perfect in composition, tone, and quality, but may not be a very good black and white.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://gregathcompany.com/udo.html

September 2004, V3#9: Design Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Top Design Ideas that COST, and some options that don’t: In today’s economy, there are lots of suggestions devoted to producing a quality book with as little cost involved to the author as possible – this issue is no exception.  However, many family projects are the culmination of a lifetime of work, many times where the author has been setting aside funds for publication for years.  Additionally, as a labor of love, some families can’t put a price on such a keepsake.  This month we’d like to offer a few suggestions if “money is no object” – and ways to make the book look that way.

  • Have a sheet for each book that is the edition number.  Each book will be 1 or 100, 2 of 100, 3 of 100, etc. (more economical – have a page “_____ of 100” and hand number in the blank once you have books.)

  • Add a photo, document, notes, etc. CD to the book.  Printing black and white photos? Include the color on on CD, etc.  The CD is a cost saver due to the fact that you don’t have to pay for the color printing, nor printing for everything you can stuff on a CD.

  • See Book Manufacturing Concepts V3#9 Production

February 2005, V4#2: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Color photos in black and white

Wonder what a color photograph would look like as a black and white print?  No need to wonder!  Digitize your photograph with the method of your choice (scan or take a digital photo of it).  Open the graphics program of your choice (MS Paintbrush, Photoshop, PrintArtist, etc.) and look around in the different menus.  Open your color photograph file.  Most, if not all, graphics programs will have an area that shows your color photograph as color (or RGB, CYMK, etc.).  In or near this notation there will be a way to change it to grayscale.  For computer beginners a quick way to define Grayscale (computer speak) for “black and white photograph”, while black and white options will drop out all gray tones and convert color to either black or white.  Choose grayscale and read and answer any computer dialog boxes that come up carefully (such as “do you want to discard color data”).  Remember as long as you don’t save your changes over the original file, you can try almost anything without loosing your original file.  Once the photo is “black and white” (grayscale) you’ll know if it will look good, bad, or OK in b/w print.  You can save this file over the original color or “save as” a different name, etc.