September 2015 Ezine – Book Design Wednesday, Sep 2 2015 

Tips to promote QR code scans

  • Provide a call to action near the code.
  • Be mysterious, but useful: consider “teasing” code content, but not fully describing.
  • Go beyond the basics, consider using your color scheme/logo/font/theme in the design of the code. If you are basic, use design options (color/shape/photo) to draw the eye to the code.
  • Test to be sure your completed size works – don’t get too small or overly large.
  • Remember content will be viewed on mobile device. Example of making desirable content work in this format might be: Instead of bringing up a full size map, email the link to the full size map, so the user can view on larger computer monitor. Likewise, remember generally slower connection speeds when deciding how much compression or segmentation of material to incorporate.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design/qr.html

August 2015 Magazine – Production Monday, Aug 17 2015 

Quick Response (QR) codes have been in use for quite some time, but this doesn’t mean they are proof against changing technology and cultural tastes. On the surface, this seems to indicate code use is better utilized in (short term) marketing material. However, if you plan for possible future changes, or only use QR for extra bonus information or material that wouldn’t be included in a “normal” printed book, these codes may bring lasting added value.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design/qr.html

August 2015 Magazine – Design Monday, Aug 17 2015 

Popular QR Code uses include

  • vCard (virtual business card) on regular business or calling cards
  • Click for more/extra/color/exclusive content (maps, individual photo or gallery, music, video, PDF)
  • Order yours via Paypal
  • Go to…Website (including pages not linked any other way), blog, social media, app, etc.
  • Exclusive text, actually encoded into the code itself, of all types – over 4,000 characters (special offers, expanded information, etc.).
  • Make a call (dialing now)
  • Produce email (material submission, sign up/request for…)

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design/qr.html

June 2006, V5#6: Production Friday, Jan 30 2009 

ISBN

The inclusion of an International Standard Book Number in your book design, places you in the “Books in Print” reference series, available in print and online from many different places. Additionally, this places the book in the database that most large chain bookstores and many smaller book shops use to special order titles. This is a way to get Barnes & Noble and Books-A-Million to carry the book without loosing inventory control. If an author has their own ISBN, they fill these orders directly. Generally, if a publisher ISBN is used, a copy or two stays with the publisher to fill these orders.

June 2005, V4#6: Marketing Thursday, Jan 29 2009 

If an author chooses to, applying for ISBN numbers will get the book(s) in the “Books In Print” reference series.  Additionally, many stores that special order, do so from this ISBN database.  An ISBN number (and barcode) may be required if one plans to utilize a large wholesale distributor. ISBN website – www.bowker.com.

November 2004, V3#11: Design Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

ISBN stands for International Standard Book Number and is usually associated with the barcode on the back of books.  This number is assigned to a publication from the “publisher’s” prefix group – ultimately from R. R. Bowker – http://www.bowker.com.  A number only applies to the publication from that publisher in that format only.  In other words, if you have an ISBN on a hardbound book, your softbound edition can’t use the same number.  Some printers have numbers that can either be used for free, or for a small fee for publications.  Additionally, regardless of who produces the book, you can purchase your own block of numbers.  This may help if you don’t plan to stay with the same production company.  If you use printer A’s ISBN for the first edition and for your second printing use printer B – you can not use printer A’s ISBN on the second edition.  For more information, check out Bowker’s site above.  An ISBN barcode may be required if you wish your book to be carried in some bookstores.

September 2003, V2#9: Production Saturday, Jan 17 2009 

ISBN stands for International Standard Book Number and is usually associated with the barcode on the back of books.  This number is assigned to a publication from the “publisher’s” prefix group – ultimately from R. R. Bowker – http://www.bowker.com.  A number only applies to the publication from that publisher in that format only.  In other words, if you have an ISBN on a hardbound book, your softbound edition can’t use the same number.  Some printers have numbers that can either be used for free, or for a small fee for publications.  Additionally, regardless of who produces the book, you can purchase your own block of numbers.  This may help if you don’t plan to stay with the same production company.  If you use printer A’s ISBN for the first edition and for your second printing use printer B – you can not use printer A’s ISBN on the second edition.  For more information, check out Bowker’s site above.