E-Magazine Volume 12 Issue 3: Production Tuesday, Mar 5 2013 

Some ideas for Electronic edition publications

  • Imbed or cross link objects such as video.

  • Format pages with background/wall paper – include graphics in layers.

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This section is drawn from
http://www.gregathcompany.com/publish/design

March 2004, V3#3: Design Tuesday, Jan 27 2009 

Make your cover and title page special:

In today’s world where it is fairly easy to “typeset” on the computer, don’t settle for only text on your book cover.  While some binding types don’t economically lend themselves to anything but text, with the right budget or the type of binding to best fit your expectations, the sky is the limit.  We suggest utilizing different fonts, and/or adding dingbats/wingdings as decorative “bullets”, clip art, drawings, photos, backgrounds and/or borders to your cover (again not all of these elements can be used on all bindings).  If a special cover layout is put together, it is also nice to match to some extent the title page.  The title page may match with font and layout, but drop border, background, and other graphic elements.

September 2003, V2#9: Design Saturday, Jan 17 2009 

While crop for effect (as mentioned last month) is usually a little more expensive at most publishing houses, we perform this service to some extent, free of charge and the end result is much more gratifying. Our professionals will choose exactly where the half-tone should be cropped and/or enlarged/reduced at no additional charge to you.  After all, are you trying to show Uncle Ed or the yard he was standing in? Of course, there are times when the background IS the picture. We also receive instructions to enlarge or reduce to a specified size without cropping and it is physically impossible to comply, because without cropping, the size specified cannot be reached from the original without warping the outcome. Enlargement or reduction can only be done overall, not in only one direction. When we face such a problem, we use the largest dimension, and let the smaller fall where it may. [If 3″x5″ is specified, when we get to the 5″ measurement, the requested 3″ may be less than 3″.] If an author prefers total control over their sizing and cropping, this can also be done with us at an additional charge in-house or they can send exactly what they want and mark “same size originals” at no additional cost.

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This section is drawn from information online at http://www.gregathcompany.com/tips.html 

August 2003, V2#8: Design Sunday, Jan 11 2009 

We receive manuscripts, including pictures with the instructions “Do Not Cut Pictures”, every day. No printer that we know of would have any reason to cut your ORIGINAL pictures/submissions. In our printing process, a negative and a new print [known as a half-tone) must be made in order to be reproduced on an offset press. Many snapshots are of one or a few family members, with a whole lot of unnecessary background. Most of these pictures show very little, if any, detail of the subject. If they were enlarged and the half tone “cropped for effect”, the same size picture would show the subject(s) in much more detail.

June 2006, V5#6: Genealogy Tuesday, Jan 6 2009 

In the world of MP3 players and multi-media computers, consider looking into podcasts for further information. The Genealogy Guys do a weekly podcast (broadcast online that can be listened to at any time/on demand) that is a pleasure to listen to – as well as having great genealogy information. If you are an oral learner (you have to be told, rather than reading, or experimenting), podcasts are a blessing, and many can be accessed at no fee. Do you find you have the radio on most of the time “in the background”? Download a podcast – or several – and you’ll have the most effective “learning by osmosis” as you can get. Podcasts can be found online for a variety of subjects – even computers and software. This can also be a targeted value added service if played at a customer service related venue. The patrons of the Muskogee, Oklahoma Library (Genealogy Department) already enjoy this feature! Search podcasts out with your favorite search engine, or query your eList(s) for recommendations.

January 2005, V4#1: Computer Thursday, Dec 25 2008 

Photoshop light photo edit

Do you have a digitized photograph that is nice, but has specks or small cracks in the background? If so, open the file in Adobe Photoshop.  Next, check to make sure your tools toolbar is visible (click “window”, if there isn’t a checkmark by “tools”, click it).  On the tools toolbar there is a clone stamp tool (the icon looks like a rubber stamper) that you click to select. Notice the bar under the pull down menus now reflects all the clone tool options.  Move your mouse near an imperfect spot (the size of the circle is controlled by the brush button at the top).  You may choose to play with the options to get what works best for you and the photo. Caution – in Photoshop you can only undo the last step.  Place the circle over an area that looks generally how the background “under” the imperfection should look.  While holding down the ALT key, left click your mouse.  Now move the circle over the imperfection (or part of it) and click.  A copy/clone of the ALT+click background replaces the imperfection.  You can repeat the steps as needed.  This generally works great with backgrounds because, as a rule, they are not too intricate. This method may also work to some extent on the subjects but is it much trickier.