September 2015 Ezine – Definitions Wednesday, Sep 2 2015 

Gripper Margin (*Grip): Margin space that is needed to get the page through the press.  Strictly speaking the *Grip is space that cannot be printed upon, and is always larger on one of the 4 edges of the paper. 

Grain – refer to paper grain

*= standard term not generally used at Gregath

August 2005, V4#8: Define Thursday, Jan 29 2009 

Bleed: A printed image that extends beyond the trim edge of a sheet of paper.

March 2005, V4#3: Marketing Wednesday, Jan 28 2009 

Marketing is promotion!  To promote a book, good things about the book contents, yourself, your family (if genealogy) or area (if research tool), and history, as well at the physical form the book takes will be pointed out. These are all selling points.  Don’t overlook something that is positive because it wasn’t the main publishing focus.  For instance, archival quality is becoming a much talked about and sought after element in reference book publishing.  Whether this was of high priority for the author personally, it may contribute to sales if it is publicized.

April 2003, V2#4: Marketing Friday, Jan 9 2009 

Prepare (and send) press releases to all media (newspaper, radio, TV, etc.) within the area as you are completing work on the manuscript, again when they are being published, and after to cover such events as signing parties, etc.

February 2007, V6#2: Genealogy Wednesday, Jan 7 2009 

The following was published in The Arkansas Genealogical Society E-zine, Volume 1, Number 4 (November 2006)

Contributed by Carolyn Earle Billingsley

Tips for Arkansas Researchers

Adding images to your family history should be part of every genealogist’s repertoire. Images like maps, pedigree charts, diagrams, and photos add interest and a personal touch to your research. But how many of you have thought about postcards?

Sometimes you don’t have an image of your grandfather visiting the courthouse, but you can still spice up your family history with a postcard image of that courthouse. In my case, for example, I don’t have a photo of my parents sitting on the steps of the high school where they graduated back in the 1940s, but I was able to find a postcard of the school that dated to that era.

You might be surprised how many post cards there are out there. E-bay is an excellent place for finding them.

And now Ancestry.com has a large collection of postcards online. Here’s their press release about this new collection:

Source Information: Ancestry.com. Historical Postcards Collection, c. 1893-1963 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, Inc., 2006. Original data: Mary Martin Postcards (www.MaryLMartin.com), Perryville, MD, USA.

About Historical Postcards Collection, c. 1893-1963:

This database contains approximately 50,000 postcards dating from about 1893-1963. About three-quarters of the postcards contain pictures from places within the United States, while the remaining fourth contains pictures from abroad. Information provided about each postcard includes:

Place information (city/town, county, state/province, country)
Caption
Postcard era (year range from which the postcard may be dated)

This database is primarily useful for obtaining a photograph or picture of a specific place in time. If you do not already have pictures of the places your ancestors lived, historical postcards are a good alternative to personal photos.

Ancestry’s collection even has an old postcard of the church my great-grandparents belonged to in Little Rock-and over 500 postcards of a variety of Arkansas sites. I especially liked the 1915 card of the old Confederate Soldiers Home, which has long since been torn down. The image includes the back side of the card, with the written message was written, along with the old stamp and the postmark.

So look around your relatives’ houses, poke around flea markets, search the Internet, peruse e-Bay, and check out Ancestry.com for images to fill in those gaps in your family’s pictorial history.

May 2005, V4#5: Genealogy Monday, Jan 5 2009 

Still looking for that lost ancestor?  When you run across the right surname in a general area at the correct time, never discard this information.  This data may be the same family (yea!) or different (boo!), but one can rarely tell when finding the data originally.  Likewise, a group that appears not to be related when the information is found, may be related and you uncover the link ten years later.  Don’t rely on research data sheets to go back and find information you uncovered 20 years ago: records get misplaced, misfiled, moved, go through natural deterioration, in some cases are discarded or destroyed, not to mention acts of God or vandalism.

May 2004, V3#5: Genealogy Sunday, Jan 4 2009 

Though you are probably already using US Gen Web Project (see previous tip), have you added your query/queries to the email lists that correspond geographically to your problem area(s)?  To get started, go to the county in question.  We suggest you then subscribe to their email list (see below for definition).  If you prefer not to, email the county coordinator with your query and request it be added to the email list.

September 2002, V1#1: Genealogy Wednesday, Dec 24 2008 

You are hot on the trail of an ancestor but have lost the trail in a certain area…

The story of a genealogist’s life!

If you haven’t already done so, familiarize yourself with general migration patterns.  When doing this, don’t overlook the Native American migrations and/or any other minority group.  This may be of help in deciding what geographical area to look in next.